Jump to content
Survival Threads
Thomas

Best Enviroment For Survival?

Recommended Posts

Talkin' to @dthomasdigital about his enviroment (arid to the max) made me wonder how much your local situation in terms of resources and weather impact your perception of survival.

For me, in the UK, I feel its pretty ideal in all ways beyond the population density. Water is aplenty, food is not an issue (at least in my neck of the woods in Dorset) and weather is moderate to an almost obscene level. I never worry about earthquakes etc. In fact,the only think Elise and I really worry about is financial security and the coming rise in joblessness due to automation.

How about you? Whats your enviroment like and how does it impact your prepping/goals?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Thomas said:

Talkin' to @dthomasdigital about his enviroment (arid to the max) made me wonder how much your local situation in terms of resources and weather impact your perception of survival.

For me, in the UK, I feel its pretty ideal in all ways beyond the population density. Water is aplenty, food is not an issue (at least in my neck of the woods in Dorset) and weather is moderate to an almost obscene level. I never worry about earthquakes etc. In fact,the only think Elise and I really worry about is financial security and the coming rise in joblessness due to automation.

How about you? Whats your enviroment like and how does it impact your prepping/goals?

 

 

I'm sitting pretty close to your previous residence so you both know the area. The area has abundant food production so unless something buggers over the animals or crops I think that if a major SHTF occurred storage and delivery might pose the bigger threat. I grew up with prepping for hard winters as a boy so I did learn from my parents. I practise those skills on and off with various things such as canning and dehydrating. Canning and drying would be a big deal for me come hard times. Due to the high population density I would probably hit the road in early spring if possible and move to a more inhospitable climate with more food abundance. Hunted and snared a good bit when I was young and would hate having to go back to that lifestyle so I hope SHTF never happens. I do not want to skin another rabbit in my life nor any other animal for that matter.  Finding a water source isn't a problem here, the bigger problem is navigating around it most of the time. More apt to drown than die of thirst.

Joblessness and financial insecurity is one of my bigger fears as well. That is a personal SHFT situation to find yourself in dire financial straights. If nothing happens on a large or global scale you may still find yourself hungry, cold and alone depending on how long it lasts or if you can pull yourself out of it. I have been noticing that wages have been dropping around here from the want ads. Prices have been going up for just about everything. Won't be long before we will be working for shelter and food if we can find work at lower wages at all due to completion for it from excess labor. That may be their plan.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the northwestern part of Virginia in the USA. We get 4 seasons, though, all denial aside, it's getting hotter every year. Maybe 1 bad winter in 7, but those are getting fewer. Good water supply, but that may change with less snowpack in the mountains.  Still a lot of undeveloped land around,  but that is changing too. Far enough inland to miss the worst of hurricanes and tropical storms, but some of the edges will still hit us. Very little tornado activity, 1 serious (non fracking related) earthquake in the past 70 years. People tend to mind their own business, fairly friendly,  nobody objects to open gun carry, so I get no  crap for a 3 inch sheath knife on my belt.

I kinda like it here.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/07/2017 at 6:12 PM, crazyman said:

I'm sitting pretty close to your previous residence so you both know the area. The area has abundant food production so unless something buggers over the animals or crops I think that if a major SHTF occurred storage and delivery might pose the bigger threat. I grew up with prepping for hard winters as a boy so I did learn from my parents. I practise those skills on and off with various things such as canning and dehydrating. Canning and drying would be a big deal for me come hard times. Due to the high population density I would probably hit the road in early spring if possible and move to a more inhospitable climate with more food abundance. Hunted and snared a good bit when I was young and would hate having to go back to that lifestyle so I hope SHTF never happens. I do not want to skin another rabbit in my life nor any other animal for that matter.  Finding a water source isn't a problem here, the bigger problem is navigating around it most of the time. More apt to drown than die of thirst.

Joblessness and financial insecurity is one of my bigger fears as well. That is a personal SHFT situation to find yourself in dire financial straights. If nothing happens on a large or global scale you may still find yourself hungry, cold and alone depending on how long it lasts or if you can pull yourself out of it. I have been noticing that wages have been dropping around here from the want ads. Prices have been going up for just about everything. Won't be long before we will be working for shelter and food if we can find work at lower wages at all due to completion for it from excess labor. That may be their plan.

Damn. That hits close to home. I agree 100% with your accessment. I definitely notice the shift in wages and job supply too. I think this is a serious problem that has no been addressed by our governments and I see nothing but trouble in the future. Automation etc.

 

On 22/07/2017 at 10:51 PM, Wyzyrd said:

I'm in the northwestern part of Virginia in the USA. We get 4 seasons, though, all denial aside, it's getting hotter every year. Maybe 1 bad winter in 7, but those are getting fewer. Good water supply, but that may change with less snowpack in the mountains.  Still a lot of undeveloped land around,  but that is changing too. Far enough inland to miss the worst of hurricanes and tropical storms, but some of the edges will still hit us. Very little tornado activity, 1 serious (non fracking related) earthquake in the past 70 years. People tend to mind their own business, fairly friendly,  nobody objects to open gun carry, so I get no  crap for a 3 inch sheath knife on my belt.

I kinda like it here.

Sounds like I would like it there too! :( Its a running joke amongst my friends and family that I should have been born a Texan. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Thomas said:

Damn. That hits close to home. I agree 100% with your accessment. I definitely notice the shift in wages and job supply too. I think this is a serious problem that has no been addressed by our governments and I see nothing but trouble in the future. Automation etc.

I think it is being addressed by our governments, that's why it's happening. Yup trouble for the common person for sure. Want to control a population put them in fear. Totalitarianism isn't accepted by a population overnight, it has to be indoctrinated slowly for it to work and also to become laisse faire for the next generation. Taking away what some might consider a right can not be done in one fell swoop it must be eased away till people don't realise they had it. Like the right to privacy, if you have nothing to hide why do you need it. Or freedom of speech for that matter, if one has nothing to say why would one need it. You can always make laws to limit it till it means nothing, like making freedom of speech a right as long as you don't offend anyone else. Well no matter what you say someone might be offended.  Want to know who rules you, look at who you can't criticize.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Best environment is probably Walmart lol!  They have it all.  t

Those of us of a certain age were raised by parents who grew up in the great depression, and the ethic of home economy was passed on through their teaching.  Rock soup.

Edited by Rick
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-07-24 at 6:41 AM, Thomas said:

 Sounds like I would like it there too! :( Its a running joke amongst my friends and family that I should have been born a Texan. 

Texas is just a little bigger than Saskatchewan, and we only have 1.1 million people here.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Rick said:

Texas is just a little bigger than Saskatchewan, and we only have 1.1 million people here.

Yeah but the cold mate. :/ 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Thomas said:

Yeah but the cold mate. :/ 

Yeah, but it's a dry cold. ¬¬  Look up videos of people throwing buckets of hot water in the air at -40 and watch it come down as pellets.  Exposed skin freezes in minutes.  A small price to pay...  It's hard to explain, but as in so many places that seem a little adverse, the locals love it.  And it isn't really that bad.

Edited by Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/07/2017 at 10:49 PM, Rick said:

Yeah, but it's a dry cold. ¬¬  Look up videos of people throwing buckets of hot water in the air at -40 and watch it come down as pellets.  Exposed skin freezes in minutes.  A small price to pay...  It's hard to explain, but as in so many places that seem a little adverse, the locals love it.  And it isn't really that bad.

I reckon i'll stick to a temperate climate ;) I still have flashbacks from shovelling snow at 3 in the morning!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎2017‎-‎07‎-‎27 at 6:46 PM, Thomas said:

I reckon i'll stick to a temperate climate ;) I still have flashbacks from shovelling snow at 3 in the morning!

Or the 1/4 inch of ice on every window of the car at 5 am makes such a great start to the day with that fine blowing snow coming of the roof and always in your face no matter which way you turn.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ice on the inside always seems harder to scrape off after sleeping in the car. Sticks on extra well for some reason.

I find something appealing about beside the fireplace, in a deep chair with a book as my favoured survival option though.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Gary_Gough said:

The ice on the inside always seems harder to scrape off after sleeping in the car. Sticks on extra well for some reason.

I find something appealing about beside the fireplace, in a deep chair with a book as my favoured survival option though.

Frost on the inside but ice on the inside from sleeping in it in winter is something I hope never to experience.

Yup that second option is much more appealing. I know it won't be long before I have to break out the scrapper again, What a horrible flashback. I'm turning off the air conditioning right now.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, crazyman said:

Or the 1/4 inch of ice on every window of the car at 5 am makes such a great start to the day with that fine blowing snow coming of the roof and always in your face no matter which way you turn.

Oh god yes. Hated that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Thomas Yesterday 2.2 inches of rain in less than an hour at my house. It's monsoon season out here we get 90% of our total annual rain between the last part of July and the first part of August. Do not play in the dry creek beds (we call them arroyos in New Mexico) and streams this time of year it could be raining up in the mountains and with no warning a wall of water can come your way. It's an awesome site but deadly.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh and just what is our total average annual rain/snow fall in my part of New Mexico just 11 inches, that's it. Now up in the northern mountains they can get 100's of inches of snow, and that is how we survive, the snow pack.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 01/08/2017 at 2:03 PM, dthomasdigital said:

Oh and just what is our total average annual rain/snow fall in my part of New Mexico just 11 inches, that's it. Now up in the northern mountains they can get 100's of inches of snow, and that is how we survive, the snow pack.

So due to the melting snow, your annual water gain is relatively predictable?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

other than places that cost you 50k a year just for rent and utilities, there's no place that's nice  year round. But, by moving 2x a year, you can always have nice weather. We use a van, a  VERY small trailer and a motorcycle. We're at high elevation/latitudes for the summer, and the opposite for winter. I dont mind a hard freeze, now and then (at night) to kill the bugs, and I dont mind 90F, for a few hours in the afternoon, if the humidity is not bad,  but you can KEEP snow and ice, and or below 20F degrees, and you can keep 100+ and/or high humidity, too. Along with the risks of traffic accidents on the ice in winter, heat stroke and burnt-up engines in summer, high costs for AC and heating, restricted outdoor fun. Between us, we clear about  60k a year and we have a high old time on half that much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×