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The wife and I are looking at a truck camper to use for camping on MTB trips and to also us at my shooting competitions all over the US. We are also thinking it could be great if ever needed as a mobil bug out. It will have a solar power unit that will run the lights and charge anything we need, along with propane for cooking. I understand that the gas will be out quick but will be a thing to have when a fire just won't work. I don't want anything I would need to tow, just something that will fit in the bed and give us shelter. Any thoughts on this or experience with truck campers? 

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I think it's a good idea, and you can customise the daylights out of it.  The bonus is space for pantry and water, and you'll fine tune what you want to carry through using it.

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I owned a Coachman Knight truck camper for 13 years ( 1976-1989 ). Loved it allot. It was my escape. All the hunting and fishing trips I went on in it. I miss those days. 
But as a bug out vehicle..... It certainly would get you out of town without a worry. That is until it's time to fuel up. Gotta hope you can get gas somewhere, somehow, and at what cost or you'll be stuck where you are. Hopefully it's not at too bad a place. But you certainly can live out of it for a while. And I don't care what the manufacturers say, it's made for a maximum of only 2 people. They advertised mine as being able to sleep 4. I don't think I'd have handled it for very long with 4 people in it.
They are really not made to live in for long periods of time. Their durability isn't all that great for long term living. Sure, for trips of a couple of weeks up to several times a years doesn't propose much of a problem. But 365 days a year of everyday living??? And for maybe a couple of years. They weren't made for that. Things will wear out and break much faster than a permanant residence would. Not so sure about todays models though which may be better. At least I had a local Coachman dealer that had all the repair items I needed. Some of your bug out provisions should include parts that most likely will wear out while you're living in it because most likely there may not be any dealers to provide parts to you.
But to get you out of town and off to a hopefully better place. It would be excellent.

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16 hours ago, PappyHiker said:

I owned a Coachman Knight truck camper for 13 years ( 1976-1989 ). Loved it allot. It was my escape. All the hunting and fishing trips I went on in it. I miss those days. 
But as a bug out vehicle..... It certainly would get you out of town without a worry. That is until it's time to fuel up. Gotta hope you can get gas somewhere, somehow, and at what cost or you'll be stuck where you are. Hopefully it's not at too bad a place. But you certainly can live out of it for a while. And I don't care what the manufacturers say, it's made for a maximum of only 2 people. They advertised mine as being able to sleep 4. I don't think I'd have handled it for very long with 4 people in it.
They are really not made to live in for long periods of time. Their durability isn't all that great for long term living. Sure, for trips of a couple of weeks up to several times a years doesn't propose much of a problem. But 365 days a year of everyday living??? And for maybe a couple of years. They weren't made for that. Things will wear out and break much faster than a permanant residence would. Not so sure about todays models though which may be better. At least I had a local Coachman dealer that had all the repair items I needed. Some of your bug out provisions should include parts that most likely will wear out while you're living in it because most likely there may not be any dealers to provide parts to you.
But to get you out of town and off to a hopefully better place. It would be excellent.

The one I am looking at is all aluminum body only wood is cabinets. I was just thinking about getting to a place off grid until it quiets down enough to move again. We are also looking at more land not to long of a drive from the house, a place that will give us a good 1000m of woods 360 degrees around with us in the middle with only one drive in. I would have something ready to block the road and make it look overgrown, people are lazy just this would keep 90% from looking. 

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5 hours ago, Chili Pepper said:

The one I am looking at is all aluminum body only wood is cabinets. I was just thinking about getting to a place off grid until it quiets down enough to move again. We are also looking at more land not to long of a drive from the house, a place that will give us a good 1000m of woods 360 degrees around with us in the middle with only one drive in. I would have something ready to block the road and make it look overgrown, people are lazy just this would keep 90% from looking. 

An old friend protected his 'hideout' camper area by planting the woods border area with blackberry bushes over a decade or so.

Kept out intruders admirably, and provided a food source.

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On 26/11/2017 at 10:42 PM, Wyzyrd said:

An old friend protected his 'hideout' camper area by planting the woods border area with blackberry bushes over a decade or so.

Kept out intruders admirably, and provided a food source.

Elise & I were thinking of doing something similar. Buy a couple of acres, have a hobbit hole bug out location and surround it with shrubs and bushes. Sounds like a solid plan B in anycase! 

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Seen a few variations. Old couple in Mexico that had sold everything and put it in a trust, then built a wooden camper on their 1/2 ton truck. Very minimalist but it was basically a place to sleep and store belongings while living in ( and care taking ) a camp ground. One other was a $50,000 air stream with all the features ( in 1981 ) owner pointed out that all the pop rivet stems were left inside the walls and rattled like mad when moving. I was helping him sort out the electronics on his furnace while discussing the unit ( a half dozen interlocks , electronic ignition, and automotive style documents ).  The layout looked nice, a little "pride in workmanship" would have gone a long way. In most ways building your own means you can use tech you are comfortable with and spend time where it's needed.

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