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SV Mark

Emergency Portable TV

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Hi,

Just discovered this great online forum.

Hope someone can please advise...

Used to have nice fairly small Sony portable B&W TV (had radio too...).

Unfortunately, with change in broadcasting, we were not able to use it anymore.

Have emergency hand-crank radio, but would like to have option use a small TV in case of power outages.

Notice that the small portable TV's now all have rechargeable batteries instead of regular batteries (AA, C, D, etc...). Seems like they all say they can run 2 - 2.5 hours on a charge. That's nice, until you want to recharge and there is still a power outage.

Anyone know of a small portable TV that runs on standard non-rechargeable batteries? If so, would greatly appreciate knowing info about it (brand, model no.) and if you know where to buy that would be helpful too, if known.

Thanks in advance for any and all input.

Mark

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Might be easier to split the problem into parts. TV receiver - tuner , power. If you have a display device , a laptop or android , then an ATSC tuner is a USB plug in dongle in the $30-$40 range. If you want it as a package then it's probably a small TV with a 12 volt input with a automotive power plug and / or wall charger. In any case displays are power hogs even now, so you'll go through batteries pretty fast if you set up an external pack ( 8 D cells = 12 volts and about $14 ) the holder should be about $6 and an in line socket ( or a triple ) in about the same range. The whole "what do I do if the batteries die" is a major theme. Closely related " what do I do when I run out of batteries" . For energy storage and weight , short of nuclear, nothing beats gas or diesel fuel, next best now is lithium batteries followed by alkaline disposable and Carbon-zinc and lead-acid . The old Ni-Fe Edison cells were pretty good if you worked them hard too. If you are thinking about at home use, maybe consider a spare car battery and a cig lighter extension with three outlets and maybe some USB charger ports, and replace the original plug with two battery clamps and a fuse . It's a spare warm battery for the car if needed and also a way to charge phones and electronics for a few days.

 

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2 hours ago, Gary_Gough said:

Might be easier to split the problem into parts. TV receiver - tuner , power. If you have a display device , a laptop or android , then an ATSC tuner is a USB plug in dongle in the $30-$40 range. If you want it as a package then it's probably a small TV with a 12 volt input with a automotive power plug and / or wall charger. In any case displays are power hogs even now, so you'll go through batteries pretty fast if you set up an external pack ( 8 D cells = 12 volts and about $14 ) the holder should be about $6 and an in line socket ( or a triple ) in about the same range. The whole "what do I do if the batteries die" is a major theme. Closely related " what do I do when I run out of batteries" . For energy storage and weight , short of nuclear, nothing beats gas or diesel fuel, next best now is lithium batteries followed by alkaline disposable and Carbon-zinc and lead-acid . The old Ni-Fe Edison cells were pretty good if you worked them hard too. If you are thinking about at home use, maybe consider a spare car battery and a cig lighter extension with three outlets and maybe some USB charger ports, and replace the original plug with two battery clamps and a fuse . It's a spare warm battery for the car if needed and also a way to charge phones and electronics for a few days.

 

Gary,

Thank you for your detailed and informative post!

Didn't know there are USB tuners...will check those out as my laptop has pretty good battery life...

As for small TVs, I like the idea of having options for different power sources...sounds like the small TVs no longer use alkaline batteries? assume they've all gone to rechargeable lithium batteries...

Yes, my question is mainly in context of using at home, if there's severe (ie, multiple days...) power outage situation.

Interesting idea to use a car battery for power to small devices...can you please share a bit more info about adding a fuse to the cable to battery? (although I'll try and google this...)

 

28 minutes ago, dthomasdigital said:

Great topic to bring up, can never have enough options to keep those communication lines open.

Thanks, and agree about having lots of options....as well as having different options helps break the monotony of going through an outage.

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3 hours ago, SV Mark said:

Interesting idea to use a car battery for power to small devices...can you please share a bit more info about adding a fuse to the cable to battery? (although I'll try and google this...)

Should be in line fuse holders available in an auto parts store, along with battery clamps. One important point is make sure you keep the positive and negative connections straight. Crossed cables will destroy electronics. In some commercial equipment a diode is added to conduct and blow a fuse if things are reversed but don't count on that. Standards the + symbol for positive,   red colour code and the central connection on a cigarette lighter outlet . On most new electronics with 'barrel" power connectors ( outer cylinder and an inner connection ) the centre is + , but never take that for granted as there are a few that aren't. You should see a graphic with a half circle  a centre dot and a line to a + or - symbol by the power socket to indicate what is used.

It's also a good idea to buy a VOM  ( Volt Ohm Meter ) so you can find polarity and also test batteries ( and trouble shoot wiring ).

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1 hour ago, Gary_Gough said:

Should be in line fuse holders available in an auto parts store, along with battery clamps. One important point is make sure you keep the positive and negative connections straight. Crossed cables will destroy electronics. In some commercial equipment a diode is added to conduct and blow a fuse if things are reversed but don't count on that. Standards the + symbol for positive,   red colour code and the central connection on a cigarette lighter outlet . On most new electronics with 'barrel" power connectors ( outer cylinder and an inner connection ) the centre is + , but never take that for granted as there are a few that aren't. You should see a graphic with a half circle  a centre dot and a line to a + or - symbol by the power socket to indicate what is used.

It's also a good idea to buy a VOM  ( Volt Ohm Meter ) so you can find polarity and also test batteries ( and trouble shoot wiring ).

Thanks again for your helpful input...

Think I understand your points...

And I have a little VOM, so, at least have that part taken care of...

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