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Manicmechanic71

Large survival knife, or smaller knife and axe?

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I'm interested in people's views on which is most useful and practical?

Obviously the large survival knife is lighter to carry than two items, but does the utility of a handier knife and heavy chopper make up for the weight?

When I was younger I used to use a brush hook and a small fixed blade, or even strong folder, but as I get older I see the attraction of less weight. 

Conversely the small knife and axe is easier to explain to non knife people than a Gerber BMF! Lol

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I'm both in a fairly warm climate and an admitted heretic, so my opinion is worth exactly what you paid for it. :)

My usual edc carry is a Cold Steel kitchen classics paring knife in a homebuilt leather sheath that also holds a ceramic crockstick.  For camping, I add a "Canadian belt knife", either a stainless Cold Steel, or my old Herters carbon steel,  to my belt, and a sheathed (cheap) kitchen cleaver vs a hatchet in my pack, and an old Normark cruiser axe in the vehicle.

I like the cleaver because it is more precise than a hatchet, and seldom need the axe. Ymmv.

 

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I had the same question last week. I was wondering if there was a zombie apocalypse, would it be better to have an axe or a knife to survive? So, I started to look up on Internet and I found this article http://nairobiwire.com/2018/01/axe-hatchet-essential-tool-diy-zombie-apocalypse-survival-kit-bug-bag.html. I decided that I prefer an axe, it's more useful, better for hunt, easier to manage when cutting firewood. In conclusion, if you're not in a zombie apocalyse, you can use it because it's a multi- functional tool. Did you already dedice which tool would you choose? Read the article and you'll be convinced.

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To be honest, I think your enviroment will dictate your tools of choice. Where I have lived, I would take nothing but a small scandi- being light on my feet is more important than chopping power.

During winter in Canada, I would have to go for an axe + small knife.

It's all relative. I imagine if I had lived in the jungle, I would favor a machete above all else. ;) 

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Other then day to day pocket knife, the last cutting tool I used, unexpectedly, was a bow saw. Trees blew down across the driveway ( it's 1/2 mile long ) and I was called to work just to find my path blocked. Was about 5 minutes later then usual. Saw lived in the vehicle grab bag ( along with assorted camping in a blizzard and fixing breakdown tools )

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23 hours ago, Gary_Gough said:

Other then day to day pocket knife, the last cutting tool I used, unexpectedly, was a bow saw. Trees blew down across the driveway ( it's 1/2 mile long ) and I was called to work just to find my path blocked. Was about 5 minutes later then usual. Saw lived in the vehicle grab bag ( along with assorted camping in a blizzard and fixing breakdown tools )

How do you feel about silky saws? I tried a bow saw in the past and found the cutting performance lackluster compared to my Silky fatboy. 

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3 hours ago, Thomas said:

How do you feel about silky saws? I tried a bow saw in the past and found the cutting performance lackluster compared to my Silky fatboy. 

I've seen good things written up about silky saws, but haven't gotten to test one out. The bow saws are wildly variable quality too. They really do need to be well tensioned and I wouldn't bet on the teeth being properly set out of the box. Still for a $20 cutting tool at hand it did the job.

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On 6/18/2018 at 5:08 AM, Gary_Gough said:

I've seen good things written up about silky saws, but haven't gotten to test one out. The bow saws are wildly variable quality too. They really do need to be well tensioned and I wouldn't bet on the teeth being properly set out of the box. Still for a $20 cutting tool at hand it did the job.

Grab yourself a bahco laplander, around 20 bucks and i found the performance to be exceptional- took apart a picnic table in minutes. 

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1 hour ago, Thomas said:

Grab yourself a bahco laplander, around 20 bucks and i found the performance to be exceptional- took apart a picnic table in minutes. 

Lists at $42 , looks worth while. Silky F180 is the same price. So I may spend a little time deciding.

Might not have been up to the 9 inch tree I was removing but most of the trees that knock over are smaller then that, a big Aspen might be 12 inches and a few of the spruce hit 28 inches , but don't have any of those near a trail let alone the driveway.

The $250 Silky Katana saw looks like it would handle anything, but a bit of a high ticket item for casual bush clearing.

Found a $10 Chinese folding saw too, looks like the same tooth pattern and density, so I think I'll order one of those as a tool bag addition. ( at some point the nylon handles will probably tear off the bag, nearly burglar proof already, at least will slow them down a bunch )

 

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On 6/19/2018 at 1:29 PM, Gary_Gough said:

Lists at $42 , looks worth while. Silky F180 is the same price. So I may spend a little time deciding.

Might not have been up to the 9 inch tree I was removing but most of the trees that knock over are smaller then that, a big Aspen might be 12 inches and a few of the spruce hit 28 inches , but don't have any of those near a trail let alone the driveway.

The $250 Silky Katana saw looks like it would handle anything, but a bit of a high ticket item for casual bush clearing.

Found a $10 Chinese folding saw too, looks like the same tooth pattern and density, so I think I'll order one of those as a tool bag addition. ( at some point the nylon handles will probably tear off the bag, nearly burglar proof already, at least will slow them down a bunch )

 

Wow, the price went up on bahco's. Eek.

At that price, the Silky is worth it I think (relative to the bahco). I think that style of saw is called a Sierra Saw? I believe Canadian Tire sold a "Colemans" branded one for under $10 too. 

That said, this was 5 years ago so who knows now! ;) 

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