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The Greeks used silver vessels to keep water and other liquids fresh. The writings of Herodotus, the Greek philosopher and historian, date the use of silver to before the birth of Christ.

The Roman Empire stored wine in silver urns to prevent spoilage.

The use of silver is mentioned in ancient Egyptian writings.

In the Middle Ages, silverware protected the wealthy from the full brunt of the plague.

Before the advent of modern germicides and antibiotics, it was known that disease-causing pathogens could not survive in the presence of silver. Consequently, silver was used in dishware, drinking vessels and eating utensils.

In particular, the wealthy stored and ate their food from silver vessels to keep bacteria from growing.

The Chinese emperors and their courts ate with silver chopsticks.

The Druids have left evidence of their use of silver.

Settlers in the Australian outback suspend silverware in their water tanks to retard spoilage.

Pioneers trekking across the American West found that if they placed silver or copper coins in their casks of drinking water, it kept the water safe from bacteria, algae, etc.

All along the frontier, silver dollars were put in milk to keep it fresh. Some of us remember our grandparents doing the same.

Silver leaf was used to combat infection in wounds sustained by troops during World War I.

Prior to the introduction of antibiotics, Colloidal Silver was used widely in hospitals and has been known as a bactericide for at least 1200 years.

In the early 1800s, doctors used silver sutures in surgical wounds with very successful results.

In Ayurvedic medicine, silver is used in small amounts as a tonic, elixir or rejuvenative agent for patients debilitated by age or disease.

 

 

http://m.silver-colloids.com/?url=http://www.silver-colloids.com/Pubs/history-silver.html&nosim=true&utm_referrer=https://www.google.com/#2807

There's silver in them thar’ corn husks

 

Mexican researchers have shown that compounds extracted from corn husks may offer a route to low-cost synthesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles.

Since ancient times, silver has been famed for its antibacterial properties - the Romans added silver coins to their drinking water to keep it clean, and during World War I, soldiers’ wounds were commonly treated with silver leaf to prevent infection. The widespread introduction of antibiotics in the late twentieth century meant that silver’s use in medical applications slowly dwindled, but recent advances in nanosilver has put it firmly back on the research agenda.

This work, published in a recent issue of Materials Letters [DOI: 10.1016/j.matlet.2015.03.097], reports on the production of nanoparticles of silver (Ag) and silver chloride (AgCl) using antioxidants extracted from corn husks. The husk that surrounds a corncob accounts for 40% of its weight, but has historically been viewed as a waste product. In 2012, its phytochemical properties were characterised and the husk was found to contain naturally-occurring compounds that could reduce silver ions. This suggested that they could be used as production agents for silver nanoparticles.

 

https://www.materialstoday.com/nanomaterials/news/theres-silver-in-them-thar-corn-husks/

 

 

 

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The metabolism of bacteria is adversely affected by silver ions at concentrations of 0.01–0.1 mg/L. Therefore, even less soluble silver compounds, such as silver chloride, also act as bactericides or germicides, but not the much less soluble silver sulfide. In the presence of atmospheric oxygen, metallic silver also has a bactericidal effect due to the formation of silver oxide, which is soluble enough to cause it. Bactericidal concentrations are reduced rapidly by adding colloidal silver, which has a high surface area. Even objects with a solid silver surface (e.g., table silver, silver coins, or silver foil) have a bactericidal effect. Silver drinking vessels were carried by military commanders on expeditions for protection against disease. It was once common to place silver foil or even silver coins on wounds for the same reason.[21]

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oligodynamic_effect

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 Sterling silver is an alloy of silver containing 92.5% by weight of silver and 7.5% by weight of other metals, usually copper. The sterling silver standard has a minimum millesimal fineness of 925.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_silver

 

So you have silver alloy with copper, there many combanition alloy, I just relize there more metal who have antimicrobial proprty but still in reasearch

Edited by Daimond25

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I've heard a lot of people talk about using silver as an antimicrobial agent- wasn't there a trend for a while for people who drank so much of the stuff they turned blue?

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6 hours ago, Thomas said:

I've heard a lot of people talk about using silver as an antimicrobial agent- wasn't there a trend for a while for people who drank so much of the stuff they turned blue?

The blue colour is just the most visible bad side effect, along with the photosensitivity.  Kidney damage is less obvious. For external use it's fine, internally it is a cumulative heavy metal, with no normal way for the body to remove it. It used to be used pre antibiotics for a wide range of things, and as metal poisoning goes it's one of the less harmful. That said.. https://rosemaryjacobs.com/  is an example of what can go wrong with patent medicines that grandfather into the present day. New medicine has to be tested for both safety and efficacy, the old stuff often has never been subject to anything like the present protocols. They may or may not be either safe or useful, but it would cost far too much to subject all the traditional meds to lab testing. The early testing would have gotten doctors jailed now, even when they worked out. Picture injecting small pox in a child after injecting them with what you hoped would protect them. ( cowpox ) It worked and so now smallpox is mostly history. ( I've been told by an anti-vaxer that the disease died out on it's own ) Now we'd need to prove cowpox was safe, and then run studies using large sample groups that were exposed during the normal course of their lives. Not fast or easy, but ethically more sound.

On the wisdom of the ancients justifying on going use. Lead oxide used to be used to sweeten wine in Roman times, hard to find anyone thinking that's a good plan now.. well cows still like to eat car batteries if they find one ( be careful to clean those up ).

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Silver is still used in some burn dressings (clearly labeled "external use only").

Traditional use of some substance does not mean that it is safe, or even works at all. Traditionally,  lead arsenate was used as an insecticide,  anhydrous ammonia was used as a fertilizer,  and elemental mercury was used to treat STD's. Not good ideas, but traditional.  

Some old stuff still works, willow bark is where we got aspirin, but knowledge has come a long way. Take advantage of the fact that we now know a lot that our grandparents didn't.  Superstitious reliance on the past can kill you.

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Best two word answer I've seen when an anti-vaxer came up with "Well what did they used to do?" ..... "They died."

If you need any more proof, the resurgence of preventable diseases where the idea that "it's too risky to vaccinate" has caught on, should be a strong hint.

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On 10/3/2018 at 10:26 PM, Gary_Gough said:

Best two word answer I've seen when an anti-vaxer came up with "Well what did they used to do?" ..... "They died."

If you need any more proof, the resurgence of preventable diseases where the idea that "it's too risky to vaccinate" has caught on, should be a strong hint.

Haha, great point Gary & in line with my own feelings on the matter.

On 9/30/2018 at 8:38 PM, Wyzyrd said:

Silver is still used in some burn dressings (clearly labeled "external use only").

Traditional use of some substance does not mean that it is safe, or even works at all. Traditionally,  lead arsenate was used as an insecticide,  anhydrous ammonia was used as a fertilizer,  and elemental mercury was used to treat STD's. Not good ideas, but traditional.  

Some old stuff still works, willow bark is where we got aspirin, but knowledge has come a long way. Take advantage of the fact that we now know a lot that our grandparents didn't.  Superstitious reliance on the past can kill you.

Yes, definitely. I do have to admit a fondness for old school Chinese oils (eucalyptus based) when I am stuffy. If it works without bad side effects, I think its fine but as you said- knowing more is the key- research, looks at side effects etc.

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