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zackmars

local emergencies near you?

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zackmars    508

Just got done talking to a relative who lives down in Corpus Christi, where Ecoli bacteria was found in the water system, and as a result, they have to boil water or use bottled.

 

I thought that this would make a neat thread, where we can talk about small "localized" emergencies, how to get through them, what we've learned, and what we could have done better

 

So lessons learned from Corpus Christi 

*stock up on bottled water

*have multiple ways to purify water

*try to avoid having to buy supplies at the  zero hour

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Dan Seven    1,302

This is a good one zackmars:

I have a well in the basement, live next to a prairie lake, and in the summertime especially, have ecoli in the water.

Most of the cabin owners have a water bottle cooler/stand for drinking water. At gas station here it is 5 bucks a jug.

For cooking, it is economical to use well water, and to just boil it for 7 minutes longer after it comes to a boil.

I installed a whole house UV filtration system in my basement 'well room'. It actually does not kill the bacteria, it irradiates them, and in so doing, sterilizes them so they cannot reproduce. A person has to stay on top of the quartz tubes and lights, however, as mineralization of the internals can reduce the transmission of the UV, as well as the light tubes have a limited life span.

For me, water is a pain in the ass to carry around, even for trekking. At 8.3 US and 9.9lb Cdn.per gallon, it is a deciding factor for me to bug in vs out, as it is a lot to process water with a portable filter or boiling to meet drinking, cooking, and washing needs.

Incidentally, I was in Costa Rica and went to visit the Zoo in San Jose, where step-daughter got a gutload of ecoli from a McDonalds hamburger. Down there, they do not give antibiotics orally, it is too slow acting as bacteria proliferates too quickly.

We went to a Dr. and she gave us a prescription for 5 bucks and came back from the pharmacy with a syringe and 2 doses of antibiotic. She shot one in her butt, and again the next morning. That night she ate a full meal.

In the succeeding months travelling that part of the world, nor the many times before, did anyone in our party ever get sick.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ron Johnson    209

Where I live in St. Louis, MO, although major snow events are rare, we get hit with at least one major ice storm every winter, often several. Most of the older areas still have the utility lines in the air on poles, not underground. So, it is not unusual to lose electricity for hours and even days when ice brings an old tree down and takes out power lines.

We've learned to keep plenty of flashlights, candles and oil lamps for light. Extra blankets and sleeping bags to sleep warmly when the furnace blowers don't work. And to keep at least some food stored, because for some reason as soon as the first ice pellet hits, all the grocery stores are magically cleaned out within seconds, especially bread and milk.

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Elise    923

100% agree with Dan, this is a really good topic - thanks for starting it up!

Worst local emergency we've had to go through is when the power went out for some time here in Toronto during the winter.

We were used to getting very short power outages in the summer, but while I was perfectly prepared for a long-term power outage in the summer - I was less than completely ready for one in the winter.

There's an article up about what we did and what I learned from having gone through the situation here, but all in all, I learned I would have liked to have a lot more emergency supplies than I did when I went through that small-scale emergency. So I threw together a list of winter emergency supplies (can be found here) and got to work on adding to what we had.

As a side note - this power outage made me really appreciate the value you get out of having good neighbours around you, and people who are willing to lend a hand or give you solid advice in situations such as these.

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Dan Seven    1,302

Again, thanks zackmars for starting this thread..

Living in a rural area, the danger here is regular power outages and snowstorms

Seismically, it is quiet, so quiet they built a synchrotron off the linear accelerator as the beam lines do not like bumps.

No hurricanes, almost no tornadoes, Poison snakes and large predators in the North and South respectively.

We have poisonous plants and the odd nasty spider..they ticks here do not carry Lyme's disease.

Incidentally, in Eastern Finland, the Siberian Tick has invaded with an incurable form of encephalitis..

I am sure it would do well here, same climate, if it ever made it's way here. A lot to be grateful for what is not here..

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DomC    127

I've survived many hurricanes in my 62 years of life here on planet earth. The worst year in '04 when my mom's house was razed during Hurricane Jeanne. Florida was hit with four hurricanes that year!

In 1979 I spent a harrowing 24hrs battling flooding in my apartment during Hurricane David. The hurricane made landfall in West Palm Beach, Florida and exited back into the Atlantic via Merritt Island, Florida. I lived in Melbourne, Florida at the time just twenty five miles south of Merritt Island. I should've evacuated, but decided to ride out the storm. I worked at Piper Aircraft in Vero Beach and the plant was shut down for many weeks due to extensive damage sustained by David. 

The  aftermaths are always harrowing too. Power outrages, downed trees, damaged houses, etc. makes life miserable, but surviving mother nature's fury has been a fact of life living in the Southeast. Life goes on...btw Florida has dodged the bullet for 11 years. We're due for a major  hurricane soon.

DomC

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dthomasdigital    1,025

I'd say in my area the emergencies that could happen:

  • Forest/Brush Fire ( A real issue, I cringe when I find out someone does not have a BOB ready to go around here)
  • Flooding (during monsoons it happens all the time)
  • industrial accidents (we have lots of technology, aerospace, defense companies here)
  • National Labs (Sandia, Los Alomos, White Sands we got 'em all)
  • earthquakes (we have hot springs everywhere and more than a few dormant volcano's)
  • Where else can you go visit where the blew up an atomic bomb and see the Alamogordo glass I think it's in October when you can get on the Trinity site. It's just a tad radioactive however.

Sounds like a real travel brochure does it not. 

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Thomas    910

Cold. So damn cold.

Beyond that, annoyances like our crappy electrical grid is all we have to contend with. I can't think of a serious environmental hazard around me besides bad drivers. 

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dthomasdigital    1,025

O

Cold. So damn cold.

Beyond that, annoyances like our crappy electrical grid is all we have to contend with. I can't think of a serious environmental hazard around me besides bad drivers. 

Oh wow I forgot to list bad drivers, we have those too.

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Elise    923

O

Oh wow I forgot to list bad drivers, we have those too.

They're a rapidly growing breed it seems.

Edited by Elise
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PappyHiker    387

Local emergencies don't bother me that much. Power outages. I can live without electricity...... Electricity only provides power for the conveniences in your life, that is unless you need it for life sustaining medical apparatuses. But candles and lanterns provide me with enough light. I have a wood burner for heat and can get allot of hot water from it. We really don't watch TV that much, but I would miss my computer. Our local fire station goes into high alert and would be open 24/7 for the entire community if someone needs someplace to go or needs help of any kind........ So you learn to live without those little things during power outages. Power will be up again in a short period of time. The bigger problems would come from wide spread power outages covering a vast area.
Same with disruptions in water supply and/or sewage problems. Its a little harder to deal with that. As for getting water, if it is localized no big deal. You suffer with water conservation and the inconvenience of going elsewhere to get water. It seems as though the government, adjoining communities, and free market jump all over these events. It really doesn't take long for water buffalos to appear and big trucks with water come on the scene...... The duration of the water disruption can bring some additional hardships. But you'll survive that one. My biggest problem would be sewage disruptions.... gotta go to the bathroom and that's harder to get rid of waste water than the fresh water is to get. And again, if the disruptions are localized, no biggie. It would be the wide spread ones I'd be worrying about.
But in any event, I really don't view local utility disruptions as being that critical. Problems like that will be solved in hopefully a short period of time. Being prepared for such annoyances can turn a bad situation into a mere inconvenience.

Edited by PappyHiker
corrected text
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Elise    923

And again, if the disruptions are localized, no biggie. It would be the wide spread ones I'd be worrying about.
But in any event, I really don't view local utility disruptions as being that critical. Problems like that will be solved in hopefully a short period of time. Being prepared for such annoyances can turn a bad situation into a mere inconvenience.

Good point. And love that last line, "Being prepared for such annoyances can turn a bad situation into a mere inconvenience." So true!

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Elise    923

 

Always keep some type of small kit in your car/truck, do not put all of your eggs in one basket 

Yeah exactly. Good, solid advice.

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Emerson    63

 Power outages and flooding mainly here - Ice and snow in the winter - a few years ago we lost power for 7 days and were flooded in for 5 of those days ( wash outs,water and debris ) - Then about a week later a second storm blew through and we lost it for another 4 days . Water is never an issue for us ... no water pump !!! ... Artisan well about 1/16 mile up the hill behind our house ... sweet,clear,and good pressure . We have a small solar set up to run the small fridge if the power goes down in the summer and can switch it to run the blowers on the wood stoves in the winter. So really its just like camping in our house. Not having to worry about those things allows us to see to some of the neighbors who don't seem to be able to cope with situations like that well.

 The only real issues here for us would be a medical emergency that we could not handle on site ....

 As far as some previous posters comments about clean water and e coli issues - e-coli is on average 0.2–0.5 microns in size - most backpacking filters have pore sizes of .1 so they will eliminate the e coli - in fact they take care of just about anything but viruses which in North America we really don't need to concern ourselves with unless in an urban environment . On a larger scale you can purchase or I recommend making a "Berkey" gravity filter - which will remove just about anything .... its basically 2 buckets with lids mount on top of one another with a pair of filters in the top one and they empty into the bottom one .

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Rspreps    160

Anyone live in areas affected by this weekends snow storm that hit the East coast? I would hope that a silver lining would be that more people see the real need to prepare and stock up before the emergency hits...still saw lots of pictures of empty shelves when people rushed to get the essentials. 

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Flip    117
4 hours ago, Rspreps said:

Anyone live in areas affected by this weekends snow storm that hit the East coast? I would hope that a silver lining would be that more people see the real need to prepare and stock up before the emergency hits...still saw lots of pictures of empty shelves when people rushed to get the essentials. 

Of course many people there will think about that ... till the sun shines again and they forget about it till the next winterstorm.

 

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Rspreps    160

Sadly true Flip. Hopefully not all of them though, as I expect that most of us on this forum started prepping due to something that impacted us. 

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tc556guy    16

Hurricane Agnes hitting upstate NY is what got me interested in being prepared as a kid

Since then it seems any but the mildest of winters has at least one or two storms that reinforce the need to not be complacent about what mother nature throws at us.

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kiwitransient    326

Thanks for starting Thread Zackmars.

 I actually replied in the German Govt. thread about this happening (still ongoing) in New Zealand.

Just a note though about filtered water..

Have just returned from Motor biking around in the Colourful Triangle in S.E. Asia.

Took up my MSR Water works filter but didn't use it.

I went up with Great Intentions of using my own Filter.

However, Water was only 04c per litre.

Unfortunately, it was Reverse Osmosis + U.V. Treated + Ozonised.

My feet swelled so bad, the skin burst/peeled. As soon as I took Electrolyte solution and (when found) Himalayan Salt, problem stopped !

Those Minerals can get stripped out in 3x days in tropics..

No fun not being able to boots on when required.

K.T.

 

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Daimond25    7

Jakarta, regular emergencies floods and we have usa laberatory (NAMRU-2 now change name as UIUC) in here doing something unknown to Indonesia goverment the issue ever become very hot potatoe in the past, somethought they collect virus seed sample later would be develop as biologic weapon and vacine, the building place under indonesia health minister  complex building, but indonesia health minister could be difficult to come inside or step inside this building, it's  very very strange thing.

They maybe use loop hole law in usa laws, cause Indonesia teritory and region not bound by usa law, they maybe doing ilegal reseach who forbid by usa laws, the most woorry and fear are the leaks of the new biologi weapon in the development in this kind facility

https://www.ft.com/content/5bc580e8-4bc1-11da-997b-0000779e2340

Edited by Daimond25

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Gary_Gough    1,186
On 2017/08/24 at 4:59 PM, zackmars said:

Looks like when Harvey hits us, it'll be a cat 3

 

Harvey. Hopefully nobody receives much damage

Up to cat 4 , I'm sure you'll be ready hope your friends and neighbors are following your lead.

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