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What are the knife laws like in your neck of the woods?

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Recent discussion on legality & what we carry has me intrigued- in Canada a lot of what is and isn't legal (in practice) depends on where you live (Middle of nowhere in the Yukon vs Toronto), your general demeanor (how aggressive you look) and what mood the officer is in.

As a baseline, its illegal to carry any weapon. So in order to edc a knife it has to be demonstrated that its for utility purposes, i.e have a good reason to carry it. I have yet to be questioned but I imagine opening packages etc. would suffice. With that said if the police officer really has a problem with you they can arrest you and you will have to explain yourself at a higher level. This level of ambiguity really bothers me because it creates a sense of uncertainty with regards to how you stand legally. I know someone who lives in the sticks who walks around town with a glock field knife on his hip without any issues and yet, if I tried to do this in Toronto I would for sure run into legal problems.

Its truly absurd. 

On top of that a certain number of knives defined by features are outright illegal including the following;

  • Balisong or butterfly knives
  • Gravity knives
  • Automatic knives
  • Push daggers

Assisted opening knives are however quite legal although sometimes (from what I have read) the police get a touch too enthusiastic and try to classify them as automatics.

 

What are the laws like in your country/state? 

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Stupid.

 

No drop points, but modifieds are fine, or at least ambiguous 

no switcb blades, or assisted opening knives, but fixed blades, and blades with locks are ok, as long as it is under 5"

 

Bowie knifes are illegal to carry, as are dirks and other stabbing knives 

 

Cannot legally own a gravity knife.

 

Texas knife laws are some of the most restrictive in the country, hold overs from the 1800's, and a few precedents set by liberal judges.

 

We have a few cases that are in the works that will hopefully change the law

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For the most part, Florida knife laws are easy. You can own any knife as long as it is not a ballistic knife and, if you keep your knives at home, you should be fine. You can also open carry any knife you want. You can conceal carry any box cutter, multi-tool, or 4 inch pocket knife. Conceal carry of any other type of knife can or can not be considered carrying a concealed weapon so watch out.

There are also local laws outside of this so look up the laws in your city as well. Most cities in Florida have clearer guidelines on what is legal and illegal than the state law. Courtesy of: http://www.knifeup.com/florida-knife-laws-explained/

DomC

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Pennsylvania's knife laws are pretty reasonable for the most part.  we have some that are dumb but there is at least a good range of options you can carry

you are allowed to own automatics, gravity knives, balis, and daggers, things that they classify as an offensive weapon with no other utility etc... and classify them as curios or curiosities.  but you are no allowed to carry them.  aside from law enforcement, military, and emergency personnel who are allowed to carry automatics.

the length limit is 3.5".  anything that size or lower, and you are fine.  in general though, the police here are pretty solid when it comes to knives in my own experience.  i have carried knives with larger blades plenty of times and never had an issue.  they will generally leave you alone unless you give them a reason to stop you.  if you are doing something dumb with a blade. you are kinda bringing it on yourself.  i have never heard of anyone around here being stopped simply because a cop saw a knife in their pocket.

assisted opening knives are legal to carry, and i have never heard of any lock restrictions. 

in all honesty though, the laws in general around the US are pretty archaic when it comes to knives.  the laws havnt updated with knife technology at all.  automatics being illegal to carry doesnt make a whole ton of sense when i have tons of manual and assisted opening knives that open faster (and one handed) than any auto knife that i own.  Of course, i am glad in a way that they havnt updated the laws to be more restrictive as well, so i guess i cant complain too much

i think its kind of funny that the factory for Microtech (well known for all of their OTF knives) has their factory in bradford PA.  even though it isnt legal to carry any of their famous OTF knives in the state.  go figure

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West Virginia Knife Laws

 

West Virginia knife laws are full of legal ease that makes them difficult to understand. This article takes the law and puts it into plain English so that anyone can understand what is legal and what is not when it comes to owning and carrying knives in the state of West Virginia.

What is Legal to Own
It is legal to own a dirk, dagger, or other stabbing knife
It is legal to own a stiletto
It is legal to own a switchblade
It is legal to own a Balisong, or butterfly knife
It is legal to own a Bowie knife
It is legal to own a ballistic knife
What is Illegal to Own
West Virginia law does not prohibit the ownership of any type of knife.

Restrictions on Carry
It is illegal to conceal carry a dirk, dagger, or other stabbing knife with a blade over 3 ½ inches
It is illegal to conceal carry a switchblade, or any automatic knife
It is illegal to conceal carry a gravity knife
It is illegal to conceal carry a Balisong, or butterfly knife
It is illegal to conceal carry any instrument capable of inflicting cutting, stabbing, or tearing wounds
It is illegal to conceal carry any “deadly weapon”
What the Law States
§ 61-7-3. Carrying deadly weapon without license or other authorization; penalties.

(a) Any person who carries a concealed deadly weapon, without a state license or other lawful authorization established under the provisions of this code, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not less than one hundred dollars nor more than one thousand dollars and may be imprisoned in the county jail for not more than twelve months for the first offense; but upon conviction of a second or subsequent offense, he or she shall be guilty of a felony, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be imprisoned in the penitentiary not less than one nor more than five years and fined not less than one thousand dollars nor more than five thousand dollars……

Definitions of Various Types of Knives
West Virginia statute defines gravity knife as any knife with a blade that can be released from the handle by the force of gravity or the application of centrifugal force (spinning the knife), and, when released is locked in place with a button or other locking or catching devise.

Switchblade knife is defined as any knife that has a spring-operated blade, which opens automatically by pushing a button, catch, or other mechanism on the handle.

Knife is defined as any devise, intended to be used or readily adaptable to be used as a weapon, and that has a sharp-edge or sharp-pointed blade, attached to a handle which is capable of inflicting cutting, stabbing or tearing wounds. The statue further says that the term “knife” includes any dagger, dirk, poniard, or stiletto, with a blade over 3 ½ inches long, any switchblade or gravity knife, and any other instrument capable of inflicting cutting, stabbing or tearing wounds.

Definition of Deadly Weapon
West Virginia statutes define deadly weapon as an instrument that is designed to be used to produce serious bodily injury or death or that is readily adaptable to use in such a manner.
The statue refers to some specific knifes that are considered deadly weapons. Those knives include, but are not limited to:

Gravity knives
Switchblades
Any dirk dagger, poniard, or stiletto with a blade over 3 ½ inches long
Any knife that falls within the statutory definition of knife
Any knife of like kind or character to those specifically mentioned
In the case of State v. Choat, the Supreme Court of West Virginia held that whether a weapon not listed is a deadly weapon, is a question for the jury, unless the trial Court can determine that the jury could not find the weapon to be a deadly weapon, as a matter of law.

Definition of Concealed
West Virginia statute defines concealed as hidden from ordinary observation so as to prevent disclosure or recognition. The statute further states that a deadly weapon is concealed when it is carried on or about the person in such a manner that another person, in the ordinary course of events, would not realize that the deadly weapon was being carried.

Definition of “About the Person”
The conceal carry law says that one may not carry “about the person” any dangerous weapon. However, it does not define “about the person”. The Supreme Court of West Virginia, in State v. Totten, defined about the person, holding that in order for a dangerous weapon to be “about the person” it had to be either on the person, or in such close proximity that it could be reached without much change in the person’s position. The Court also said that the weapon had to be readily accessible when the person reached for it.

Exceptions to Conceal Carry Laws
West Virginia law provides some exceptions to the law prohibiting the conceal carry of deadly weapons. Exceptions include those who are carrying on their own premises or from a place of purchase, at their place of business, or to or from their place of business, and certain government employees, such as law enforcement officers, Judges, and correctional officers.

License to Carry a Concealed Deadly Weapon
West Virginia offers licenses for those who wish to carry a concealed deadly weapon, and meet the requirements for obtaining such a license. In order to qualify for a license, one must meet the following requirements:

be a citizen of the United States
have been a resident of West Virginia for at least one year next prior to the date of application
be an adult of good moral character and temperate habits
not have been convicted of any felony or handgun offense
have been employed for five years
be qualified to handle handguns
have “good reason and cause” to carry such weapon
post a $ 5000 surety bond.
Conclusion on West Virginia Knife Law
It is legal to own any type of knife in West Virginia.

It is illegal to conceal carry a dirk dagger, poniard, or stiletto with a blade over 3 ½ inches long, a switchblade, gravity knife, butterfly knife, or any instrument capable of inflicting cutting, stabbing, or tearing wounds.

It is legal to open carry any type of knife.

Sources
W. Va. Code § 61-7-2 (2013)
W. Va. Code § 61-7-3 (2013)
W. Va. Code § 61-7-6 (2013)
State v. Totten, 289 S.E.2d 491 (1982)
State v. Choat, 363 S.E.2d 493 (1987)

wv-150x150.jpg

Edited by Hillbillybonez
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I've handed my pocket knife ( 3 inch blade suitable for shaving ) to RCMP to open boxes, with no comment. If you attacked someone with a sharpened butter knife, that would be a weapon. My favourite kitchen knife is a 12 inch blade, stainless steel knock off of a Roman gladius ( not intentional I'm sure ), as long as I'm just attacking cabbage not an issue, if I take it to a bar fight that would be a) premeditated b) indictable c) very bad form.  Belt knife might not even get a comment flying out of Wollaston but would have airport security go into panic mode south of LaRonge ( harmonized with US flying rules at that point. Actually get off the plane, go through airport security, get back on the same plane there. ). Really if you are fighting with anything other then an open hand you can be in trouble, my favourite bar fight technique is to buy a round and ask "what were we arguing about ?". Is an interesting point though, I'll ask the local CPL what his understanding of the laws are next time I run into him.

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And I just asked the local RCMP Corporal, "grey area" it all depends on intent and actions. If you are committing a crime and have a knife, even in your pocket, you are armed. If you have a reason to be carrying, and just going about your business, no problem.

I don't think this is uniquely Canadian either. I recall a Federales north of Acapulco looking at my camillus electrician knife for a minute, I suspect he was deciding if it was worth giving me a hard time over it. Probably the limited number of pesos in my wallet was the deciding factor.

Seems to tie in with our gun laws too. "If you point a gun at another person you have committed a criminal offence"    ( that's from memory, but I did score 100% on the FAC test so I should be close ) A tool becomes a weapon as soon as you threaten someone with it. Some things are weapons because there isn't much else they are good for. Hand guns for instance, you can't hunt with them, so other then poking holes in people they have limited utility. Samurai swords would have similar implications. Carry on the street and you can expect to be doing some explaining, locked in a display case, less problematic. Better still, locked up and hidden.

So really there is no hard and fast definition of what's ok and what's not. The difference between a precision tool and a murder weapon comes down to who is wielding that adze, and at what.

If asked why you have a knife, I wouldn't suggest "self defence" as your answer. Cutting carpet, boxes, rope, gaskets, wire .. should produce happier results.

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Nebraska knife laws are considered to be among the more liberal, but they tend to be super unclear (thanks to the super conservative legislature, but it is a one house legislature which is nice). That Nebraska is considered a liberal knife state is a total misnomer of course since anything over 3.5" in your pocket could get you hit with a conceal carry charge. There is nothing in law saying if having the knife in a belt holster would be considered concealed either and it is not like they have not visited the weapons topic for updating recently since the last update was in 2009. The basic definition of a knife is "the instrument is a dangerous instrument capable of inflicting cutting, stabbing, or tearing wounds, and thus is a "knife"" under the law. Also knives are illegal for felons, fugitives and people under a domestic violence restraining order. Technically a knife is not a knife unless it is over 3.5" here, but I bet any district attorney could find a way around that if they wanted to.

As some others have mentioned, the knife laws here tend to tie into gun laws.

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And I just asked the local RCMP Corporal, "grey area" it all depends on intent and actions. If you are committing a crime and have a knife, even in your pocket, you are armed. If you have a reason to be carrying, and just going about your business, no problem.

I don't think this is uniquely Canadian either. I recall a Federales north of Acapulco looking at my camillus electrician knife for a minute, I suspect he was deciding if it was worth giving me a hard time over it. Probably the limited number of pesos in my wallet was the deciding factor.

Seems to tie in with our gun laws too. "If you point a gun at another person you have committed a criminal offence"    ( that's from memory, but I did score 100% on the FAC test so I should be close ) A tool becomes a weapon as soon as you threaten someone with it. Some things are weapons because there isn't much else they are good for. Hand guns for instance, you can't hunt with them, so other then poking holes in people they have limited utility. Samurai swords would have similar implications. Carry on the street and you can expect to be doing some explaining, locked in a display case, less problematic. Better still, locked up and hidden.

So really there is no hard and fast definition of what's ok and what's not. The difference between a precision tool and a murder weapon comes down to who is wielding that adze, and at what.

If asked why you have a knife, I wouldn't suggest "self defence" as your answer. Cutting carpet, boxes, rope, gaskets, wire .. should produce happier results.

Very interesting Gary, its definitely all about the intent and that bothers me as I find the police have too much power in that they can make a "judgement" call that could ruin your day when all you wanted to do is go home.

Really wish we have a clear cut legal system. 

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This could be one of those "be careful what you wish for" moments. Think about who makes the laws. I expect, handed the task of making one law to cover everybody our politicians would opt for the same rules as flying, no sharp objects, no tools ( I've had to surrender a key fob crescent wrench ) no matches, lighters etc. and random searches to make sure nothing got missed. 

That giant make work project was sold as "making it safe to fly" after all so many people were killed flying every day. /sarc. Seriously the general population was deliberately scared, mostly by their own leaders, for political gains, and went along with this.

I'd rather have a chat with an RCMP and at least having a chance to reason then have clear cut laws that outlaw anything other then buying stuff. Most of the politicians come from a poly-sci, legal or finance background. Confronted with any need, they fully expect to be able to call someone to fix/ deliver. By extension they will think this is how all normal people live ( normal is almost always defined as "what I'm used to" ). The fact that the people providing the services also have lives isn't likely to cross their minds.

You are somewhat subject to chance of course. The more experienced the police the better. For examples, 35 years ago ( pre airport sillyness ) a guy I know flew into Regina, rooky  cop draws his gun and yells "freeze" everyone stands frozen while an older cop comes over and asks what's up. "He has a knife" , old guy asks my friend "Just fly out of the bush?" "Yes." "put it in your pack."

Other stuff that happens, cop confronts a guy who is slurring his words, stumbling, very combative and shaking. Most will assume they are facing a drunk and will arrest on the spot. Generally right, but those same symptoms can also be insulin shock, a more experienced cop will know that and check. If they miss it a competent guard should pick up on it too, but if the prisoner has passed out it might not be that obvious to them either.

Some flexibility and judgement is a good thing when there is the experience to inform judgement. Can we codify this and not create even larger problems? I'm doubtful.

Edited by Gary_Gough
typo
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Very interesting Gary, its definitely all about the intent and that bothers me as I find the police have too much power in that they can make a "judgement" call that could ruin your day when all you wanted to do is go home.

Really wish we have a clear cut legal system. 

I heard a saying over the weekend, and I had read it before somewhere as well that seems apt to your statement.

"I have never known a situation so bad that the police could not make it worse." Not always true, but it has been true enough a few times in my life.

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In Serbia (far away from USA) knife laws are somewhat similar to something I've read here.

NOT LEGAL to carry:
- Automatic opening folding knife (considered as attacking weapon)
- Double edged knife for stabbing (also a weapon)
- ANY FIXED BLADE knife... even if you carry a kitchen knife it could be a problem, but it depends on a way you carry it.
- Assisted opening folders are treated same as automatic (you could run into a problem for carrying a Kershaw speedsafe kinfe)
- Balisong or butterfly knife (also considered as attacking weapon)


LEGAL to carry:
- Multitool as Victorinox, you won't run into a problem with them except if you participated in a street fight or else..
- Folding knives (the less tactical it looks, the better. Even some people had problems with Opinels, for no particular reason)
- FIXED BLADE knife, only if you are on your way to hunting, and nothing else.



-------------------------------------
- Any knife is legal to own and keep it home. You can even buy all types of cheap knives at markets, cheap Chinese stores.
- You can own any type of cold weapon, no one will bother.


-------------------------------------
- There's been situations where police took away Opinels for no reason from people who were hanging in the nature by the river.. why? ....because they can.
- There were situations where police took away knives from people who were driving a car, and carrying their knife in a car, in trunk, in a bag... wtf?!?!?

 Fixed blades are considered as a weapon in any situation except if you went hunting, and by law, you are not allowed to carry a fixed blade, e.g. Morakniv if you are going to a nature, hiking or anything else, the police can take it if they want, but it's up to them.

 

Fortunately, I was lucky to never run into a problem, and at some times I was carrying Cold steel Magnum Tanto II (not legal as it is clearly a weapon), Mora Outdoor 2000, and 2-3 folders in backpack. :D


Conclusion:  knife law is pretty muddy over here, and as it is, it gives policemen total flexibility to do almost whatever they want and see proper for that situation (also can take away your knife if they see you scared and keep it in their pockets, without writing you a report)...

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I have to say we have a very interesting knife law.

In my opinion it is a very well thought out law.  

You can carry around a Panga/Sword or Butchers knife if you like.  It is presumed that you as a law-abiding citizen will take the responsibility to use the tool for legal and none threatening or violent means.  It is interesting as the law believes its citizens to be good people who work for a living and abide by the laws the countries have.  Most places believe if you own a knife or worse a gun you are immediately classified as a killer and you are guilty,…

You can carry the knife openly or concealed.

As soon as you use your tool to commit a crime, it immediately is classified as illegal weapon no matter the size.

So if you carry a full size Machete to your job and you cut down trees and grass with it the whole day and then carry it back home it is permitted.

If an individual with ill intent takes a pen knife with a 1inch blade and commits a crime with it, it immediately is classified as an illegal weapon in the hands of a criminal.  In this case the person is judged for doing the crime and not the inanimate item.  Even if the knife is no longer in play, the individual is still seen as the threat.

I hope it remains like that!!!

Kind regards,
Rowan H. Robbertze

 

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This could be one of those "be careful what you wish for" moments. Think about who makes the laws. I expect, handed the task of making one law to cover everybody our politicians would opt for the same rules as flying, no sharp objects, no tools ( I've had to surrender a key fob crescent wrench ) no matches, lighters etc. and random searches to make sure nothing got missed. 

That giant make work project was sold as "making it safe to fly" after all so many people were killed flying every day. /sarc. Seriously the general population was deliberately scared, mostly by their own leaders, for political gains, and went along with this.

I'd rather have a chat with an RCMP and at least having a chance to reason then have clear cut laws that outlaw anything other then buying stuff. Most of the politicians come from a poly-sci, legal or finance background. Confronted with any need, they fully expect to be able to call someone to fix/ deliver. By extension they will think this is how all normal people live ( normal is almost always defined as "what I'm used to" ). The fact that the people providing the services also have lives isn't likely to cross their minds.

You are somewhat subject to chance of course. The more experienced the police the better. For examples, 35 years ago ( pre airport sillyness ) a guy I know flew into Regina, rooky  cop draws his gun and yells "freeze" everyone stands frozen while an older cop comes over and asks what's up. "He has a knife" , old guy asks my friend "Just fly out of the bush?" "Yes." "put it in your pack."

Other stuff that happens, cop confronts a guy who is slurring his words, stumbling, very combative and shaking. Most will assume they are facing a drunk and will arrest on the spot. Generally right, but those same symptoms can also be insulin shock, a more experienced cop will know that and check. If they miss it a competent guard should pick up on it too, but if the prisoner has passed out it might not be that obvious to them either.

Some flexibility and judgement is a good thing when there is the experience to inform judgement. Can we codify this and not create even larger problems? I'm doubtful.

Some really excellent points Gary and i never really considered the downside of clear cut laws. Unfortuntely most of my experiences with the police haven't been super positive and with the sort of gear I review I always find myself feeling quite defensive when talking to the RCMP. Maybe its just Toronto though!

 

I heard a saying over the weekend, and I had read it before somewhere as well that seems apt to your statement.

"I have never known a situation so bad that the police could not make it worse." Not always true, but it has been true enough a few times in my life.

Basically my feelings on the matter too. 

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In MS I don't think there is any laws on on neck knife restrictions. Open carry is legal without permit here so knifes really don't have any regulation. If I understand correctly you just can't open carry a knife with a longer than 7 inch blade. And convicted convicts can't posses one with a 5 inch blade. Of coarse you can't walk into a school with a Rambo blade flopping off you hip but that's common sense. I've been in law enforcement for nearly 5 years since I left active military and I have heard of anyone being charged with such crime. In a state where an estimated 92 of 100 citizens have firearms, edged weapons aren't much concern.

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Mississippi Knife Laws

missMississippi knife laws are fairly relaxed, but because they are found in several different places within the code, and contain cross references and legalese, they may be difficult to read and follow. This article translates the legal ease into plain English that anyone can understand.

What is Legal to Own

It is legal to own Balisong knives, also called butterfly knives.
It is legal to own dirks, daggers, stilettos, and other slim knives.
It is legal to own disguised knives like belt knives.
It is legal to own undetectable knives–knives that will not set off metal detectors.
It is legal to own throwing stars and throwing knives.
It is legal to own Bowie knives and other large knives.
It is legal to own switchblades, gravity knives, and automatic knives.
Mississippi does not restrict ownership of any type of knife for those over the age of eighteen, who have not been convicted of a felony.

What is Illegal to Own

It is illegal for a minor or a convicted felon to own a bowie knife
It is illegal for a minor or a convicted felon to own dirk knife
It is illegal for a minor or a convicted felon to own a butcher knife
It is illegal for a minor or a convicted felon to own a switchblade
Limits on Carry
It is illegal to carry concealed any bowie knife
It is illegal to carry concealed any dirk knife
It is illegal to carry concealed any butcher knife
It is illegal to carry concealed any switchblade or automatic knife
You may carry any knife concealed if it is concealed in your vehicle, and not on your person.
You may carry any knife concealed if you are participating in a sports activity where such a knife is legitimately used.
You can open carry any knife in Mississippi, unless you are a minor or a student on educational property.
What the Law States
Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-1. Deadly weapons; carrying while concealed; use or attempt to use; penalties

(1) ….Any person who carries, concealed in whole or in part, any bowie knife, dirk knife, butcher knife, switchblade knife, metallic knuckles, blackjack, slingshot, pistol, revolver, or any rifle with a barrel of less than sixteen (16) inches in length, or any shotgun with a barrel of less than eighteen (18) inches in length, machine gun or any fully automatic firearm or deadly weapon, or any muffler or silencer for any firearm, whether or not it is accompanied by a firearm, or uses or attempts to use against another person any imitation firearm, shall upon conviction be punished as follows:

(a) By a fine of not less than One Hundred Dollars ($ 100.00) nor more than Five Hundred Dollars ($ 500.00), or by imprisonment in the county jail for not more than six (6) months, or both, in the discretion of the court, for the first conviction under this section.

(b) By a fine of not less than One Hundred Dollars ($ 100.00) nor more than Five Hundred Dollars ($ 500.00), and imprisonment in the county jail for not less than thirty (30) days nor more than six (6) months, for the second conviction under this section.

(c) By confinement in the custody of the Department of Corrections for not less than one (1) year nor more than five (5) years, for the third or subsequent conviction under this section.

(d) By confinement in the custody of the Department of Corrections for not less than one (1) year nor more than ten (10) years for any person previously convicted of any felony who is convicted under this section.

(2) It shall not be a violation of this section for any person over the age of eighteen (18) years to carry a firearm or deadly weapon concealed in whole or in part within the confines of his own home or his place of business, or any real property associated with his home or business or within any motor vehicle.

(3) It shall not be a violation of this section for any person to carry a firearm or deadly weapon concealed in whole or in part if the possessor of the weapon is then engaged in a legitimate weapon-related sports activity or is going to or returning from such activity. For purposes of this subsection, “legitimate weapon-related sports activity” means hunting, fishing, target shooting or any other legal sports activity which normally involves the use of a firearm or other weapon.

Definition of Concealed Carry

In Martin v. State, the Supreme Court held that a weapon which was only partially concealed, was considered concealed (Martin v. State, 93 Miss. 764 (1908)).

Definition of Various Knifes

The Mississippi code does not define dirk knife, bowie knife, or any other type of knife, except a “switchblade knife” which it defines as any knife with a blade that opens automatically, by releasing a spring or similar mechanism. In 2010, the Supreme Court in Summerall v. State, stated that absent a definition, a word had its ordinary and common meaning. It then defined “dirk knife” as a weapon with at least one sharpened edge, which tapers to a point, and is designed primarily for stabbing. In 2012, the Court of Appeals found, in Thomas v. State, that because it did not have a knife blade to examine, it could not determine whether the knife Thomas used to stab his victim was a butcher knife or a steak knife. It was therefore, it was up to the jury to decide, based on other evidence, what type of knife Thomas had used. The state of Mississippi has appealed this decision, however, and as of May 2013, the case is pending in the Mississippi Supreme Court.

Students and Educational Property

It is a misdemeanor in Mississippi for a student, on educational property, to possess or carry any bowie knife, dirk knife, dagger, switch blade, or automatic knife, whether it is concealed or not. It is also a misdemeanor to encourage or to aid a minor to possess or carry such a knife on educational property.

Educational Property Defined

“Educational property” is defined by Mississippi law as any public or private school building, bus, campus, recreational area, or other property owned, used, or operated by any local school board, school, college or university board of trustees, or directors for the administration of any public or private educational institution. It also includes property of the Oakley Youth Development Center, operated by the Department of Human Services. It does not include any sixteenth section school land where no school building, school campus, recreational area, or athletic field is located.

Other Mississippi Knife Laws
Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-19 makes it illegal for a person carrying any knife that it is illegal to conceal carry, to exhibit the knife in a rude, angry, or threatening manner, except if in self-defense.

Under  Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-13, it is illegal to give any knife that it is illegal to carry concealed to a minor or an intoxicated person, if you know the person to be a minor or intoxicated.

Conclusion on Mississippi Knife Law

It is legal to own any knife in Mississippi, unless you are a minor or have been convicted of a felony. Minors and felons may not own bowie, dirk, butcher, or switchblade knifes. You can open carry any knife in Mississippi. You may not conceal carry any bowie, dirk, butcher, of switchblade knife, unless it is concealed in your vehicle and not on your person, or you are fishing, hunting, or participating in some sporting activity in which it is common to use that type of knife.

Sources
Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-1 (2012)
Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-5 (2012)
Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-13 (2012)
Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-15 (2012)
Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-19 (2012)
Martin v. State, 93 Miss. 764 (1908)
Summerall v. State, 41 So. 3d 729 (Miss. Ct. App. 2010)

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Don't quote me, but I think in TN one can carry a regular folding knife concealed or not as long as the blade isn't beyond 4". Anything longer can be carried in a sheath not concealed. I should probably double check the TN laws though. My son likes to carry three knives. His largest one is just under the legal limit. The other two are well within.

Kaye

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Tennessee Knife Laws

[tn] Tennessee knife laws can be difficult to understand, due to the legislature’s vague language and the Court’s reluctance to offer definitions of the terms used in the statutes. This article will track down the law and explain it with clear language that makes sense to everyone.

What is Legal to Own

It is legal to own a Bowie knife
It is legal to own a dirk, dagger, or other stabbing knife
It is legal to own a disguised knife such as in a belt buckle or lipstick
It is legal to own a stiletto

It may be legal to own a butterfly knife, however, one should check with an attorney first, as Tennessee’s definition of a switchblade could include a butterfly knife. Courts in most states would call a butterfly knife one that opens by “gravity or inertia”, which is how Tennessee defines a switchblade knife. However, other Courts have viewed butterfly knives, not as automatic or gravity knives, but as a type of pocketknife. As of June 2013, Tennessee’s Courts have yet to weigh in.

What is Illegal to Own

Tennessee Code § 39-17-1302 makes it illegal to own a switchblade knife or any other implement for the infliction of serious bodily injury or death, which has no common lawful purpose.

Restrictions on Carry

It is illegal to open or conceal carry a switchblade
It is illegal to open or conceal carry any knife with a blade exceeding four inches in length, with the intent to go armed.

Definitions of Various Types of Knives

Tennessee statute defines a knife as any bladed hand instrument that is capable of inflicting serious bodily injury or death by cutting or stabbing a person with the instrument. Switchblade is defined as any knife with a blade that opens automatically by hand pressure applied to a button or other device in the handle or by operation of gravity or inertia. No other knives are defined by Tennessee statute or case law. Butterfly knives are mentioned in several Appellate and Supreme Court cases in Tennessee; however, the Court does not offer any type of definition for a butterfly knife.

Intent to go Armed Defined

Tennessee statutes do not define “intent to go armed”, however the phrase has been the subject of several appeals. As early as 1889, the Supreme Court of Tennessee recognized, in Moorefield v. State, that carrying a pistol to and from a hunting trip, was not intending to go armed. In 1957, in the case of Hill v. State, the Tennessee Supreme Court stated, “We gather the purpose of going armed from the facts of each particular case.” In 1976, the Court of Criminal Appeals followed the Hill decision, in Cole V. State, holding that the necessary intent to support a conviction for carrying a weapon, the intent to go armed, may be proven by the circumstances surrounding the carrying of the weapon. The Court also stated that the mere carrying of a weapon did not deprive a person of the right to presumed innocent. In 2002, in State v. Neely, the jury found that Mr. Neely was guilty of possession of an illegal knife with the intent to go armed, after a knife was found in his car, which contained various items of personal property. While Mr. Neely argued that the knife was simply kept in his car, along with other items he owned, the jury found that because Mr. Neely had recently threatened his girlfriend, he could have been carrying the knife in order to make good on his threats. The Court, agreeing with the jury, upheld the conviction.

Defenses to Unlawful Possession or Carry

It is a defense to unlawful possession or carry of a knife if the possession or carrying of the knife was:

Incident to a lawful hunting, trapping, fishing, camping, sport shooting, or other lawful activity
Incident to using the weapon in a manner reasonably related to a lawful dramatic performance or scientific research
Incident to displaying the weapon in a public museum or exhibition
In the person’s own home, property, or place of business

Certain government employees may also have a defense to the unlawful carry or possession of a weapon.

Penalties for Unlawful Possession or Carry

A first offense of unlawful possession or carry of a knife is a Class C Misdemeanor, which carries a jail sentence of up to 30 days, and a fine of not more than five hundred dollars ($500). A second offense is a Class B Misdemeanor, which carries a jail sentence of up to six (6) months and a fine of not more than five hundred dollars ($500).

Conclusion on Tennessee Knife Law

It is illegal to own or carry (either openly or concealed) a switchblade knife.

It is illegal to carry any knife with a blade longer than 4 inches, with the intent to go armed. It is, however, legal to open or conceal carry any legal knife without the intent to go armed, such as for hunting, fishing, work, or any other lawful purpose.
Sources

Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1302 (2013)
Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1307 (2013)
Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1308 (2013)
Moorefield v. State, 73 Tenn. 348, (1880 Tenn.)
Hill v. State, 298 S.W.2d 799 (1957)
Cole v. State, 539 S.W.2d 46 (Tenn. Crim. App. 1976)
State v. Neely, No. E2001-02243-CCA-R3-CD, Tenn. Crim. App.
Tenn. Code Ann. § 40-35-111 (2013)

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" Pursuant to recent changes in Canada's importation regulations, items similar to the ones currently on your XXXXXXXXXXXXX order (one-hand opening folders and/or finger rings with blades) have been confiscated by the Canada Border Services Agency. "

Was for a pretty vanilla folder with an opening stud.

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10 hours ago, Gary_Gough said:

" Pursuant to recent changes in Canada's importation regulations, items similar to the ones currently on your XXXXXXXXXXXXX order (one-hand opening folders and/or finger rings with blades) have been confiscated by the Canada Border Services Agency. "

Was for a pretty vanilla folder with an opening stud.

This seems to be a bigger and bigger issue with getting knives into Canada, where blades that are 100% legal, are being "seized" by border services, with no course of action to appeal or attempt to get your blade back.  It's hit or miss too, since I know people who have successfully shipped in full auto's, and others who have had small Spyderco's get seized.  Now some of the larger USA retailers won't even ship "one handed opening" knives to Canada at all.

I've recently purchased a custom knife that is fully legal here in Alberta, and when it hit the border it was "Sent for further processing".  That was now 2+ weeks ago, and I feel like any day I'm going to get the dreaded "seized" notification you posted above.

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This seems to be a good link to check for legislation in various countries:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knife_legislation

Reading this for the Netherlands I am not allowed to have an EDC knife like the CRKT Moxie ready in my pocket but I will do it anyway. As long as it is not visible and I don't attract attention it should be fine. And if not I hope there is WiFi in jail :D

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On 1/29/2016 at 8:24 PM, Gary_Gough said:

" Pursuant to recent changes in Canada's importation regulations, items similar to the ones currently on your XXXXXXXXXXXXX order (one-hand opening folders and/or finger rings with blades) have been confiscated by the Canada Border Services Agency. "

Was for a pretty vanilla folder with an opening stud.

Pretty sure Massdrop stopped shipping knives to Canada a while back, but now they're back to doing so, which is really nice :)

Glad it didn't last too long, hopefully the confiscations don't get more frequent from here on out, though certainly possible/likely =/.

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Arranged for an alternate shipper with the condition "no refund if CBS confiscates". Was a couple of Kershaw 3830 . Came through fine. I can understand the seller being cautious though, depending on margin one confiscation can easily = three lost sales in costs.

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3 hours ago, Gary_Gough said:

Arranged for an alternate shipper with the condition "no refund if CBS confiscates". Was a couple of Kershaw 3830 . Came through fine. I can understand the seller being cautious though, depending on margin one confiscation can easily = three lost sales in costs.

Yeah exactly. I don't blame the sellers at all. The confiscations are as bad for them as they are for us. Or, well, worse rather. Either way they're losing - by declining sales or by having to ship and ending up with confiscations.

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Great thread... Leaving for Florida tomorrow and got some good info!  Will stow my Tenacious in my checked bag and take that.  

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