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WiseGuy

Best all-around caliber for BOB weapon?

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The history of the 303 makes for interesting meditation material for techies. Started out as a black powder round, then cordite, then nitrocellulose. If you had an 1880s 303 rifle it would still take new ammunition and considering the vast majority of Enfields are over 70 years old they have held up very well. I'm sure we could make a much hotter round in the form now, but would it be safe to fire in an older gun? Some rifles are loose enough that the brass stretches more then I like. More of an issue if you like reloading and even then it's just a higher rejection rate on the spent brass after resizing. The rifle design has much in common with a Red River cart too, as in no shock absorbers, so the only thing reducing the kick is the gun's mass. The lighter jungle carbine was noted for more recoil as it is about 2 pounds lighter, and the "sports" modified guns with much of the wood removed just add to that. Over all there are good reasons to just accept the combination as is. If an update was introduced that changed anything too radically it would cause problems, better to create a different form factor and start over.

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@kiwitransient The bayonet is kind of a last resort. I have more than 1 story about Hunters that i know that have been injured by a Deer in it's last throes when a hunting knife was in the hand after the shot.

The average .303 is a heavy gun. My #5 weighs 7 lbs and that is a big relief to me.

The 30-30 is HIGHLY prized among the native trappers and hunters here, precisely for the reason that You describe as handy, and easy to cycle off the 2nd or 3rd round as needed, with low recoil.

The "Pre-1964" with forged receivers are commanding higher prices in good condition, and i have seen Pre and Post in the hand at the same time, and must say that it is quite a difference in quality.

The 16" barreled one that You have is usually called the "Trapper" Model around here. If brought in used on trade to a gun shop here in decent shape, it will be gone in a day or 2 such is the demand, as the US production ended 10 years ago. A think that the Japanese are still offering one at an eye popping price.

cheers

Edited by Dan Seven

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@Gary_Gough   So true about the old battle rife. It is dated.

A good friend of mine has a Tikka in Stainless, and weight is about the same as the jungle carbine.

It is really well made, and many know, a subsidiary of Sako in Finland. His is in .308.

Another sweet option in Canada is the Norinco M305, the Chinese made M-14 in .308.

This rifle has a steel receiver and a chrome lined barrel and 18.5 " as a shorty.

These 3  rifles all can be had for about 700 to 750 Canadian. New, or of course Used.

A friend of mine has all 3, and the Tikka would be the most difficult for him to part with as

it is capable of astonishing accuracy. Basically shooting out a dime at 100m..

cheers

 

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The Tikka is well thought of here as well for its  great accuracy and lightness. In stainless steel with synthetic stock, what is not to like? other than price of course..

Mate of mine had one in Australia He used to head shoot foxes with in .17 caiber as the round wouldn't exit and ruin pelt. $35 per pelt back then.

300 meters at night was a close shot.. Spot lighting was the way we did it as they are just not seen during the day unless put up when pig hunting.

Had one disappear one night in the middle of a 30+ acre paddock. Just couldn't whistle it up or anything. There was one tree in paddock for shade, and this blasted fox actually climbed it to hide.. cunning beggar !

We didn't know they could climb trees. He nearly out foxed us.

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7.62x39 makes a great deer round, its just below a .30-30 power wise. Also makes a great hog round.

 

.22lr, while it does have an impressive repertoire, keep in mind that it is EXTREMELY common, and EXTREMELY cheap, so it should come as no surprise that there are tons of shootings with .22 on record, hell, between the ruger 10/22 and marlin model 60 (the 2 most popular semi auto .22lr rifles) there are over 17 million guns.

While you can look at all the people who are no longer breathing due to the .22, you need to keep in mind that there are a lot more people who have been shot, and survived.

 

In short, correlation doesn't equal causation 

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@Zackmars  I have to agree that the 7.62x39 is a good choice for a Deer Round.

Up here in Canada the 'Black Rifles" are not allowed for hunting. Somewhere on this list i posted 

'analogs' that were still allowed. A friend has purchased an 'upper' for his AR type in 7.62x39 

in the case he finds himself bushed in event of social breakdown and has to bug out of town.

His upper is designed to go onto a NEA and made by them. His NEA is still a .556 if he needs.

The NEA 7.62x39 platform is purpose built with no issues with the harder primers or mags as is 

seen by other conversions, and frankly, the build quality imho is very good indeed.

Of course ammunition is half the price in bulk up here in comparison to the .556.

So if a person can stand the idea of a canuck AR it is a neat way to go.

Others may want a rifle legal to hunt up here in canuckland in 7.62x39 and the Ruger Mini 30

is a nice choice, albeit a bit pricy if the utility of an SKS is just too common to be handled.

Incidentally, the 'dirty .30' and '3 ought 3' are very popular up here and a usual response to the fact that they are old is something like "Don't tell that to the umpteen deer or moose I've shot"

Indeed they are the last to know or care how they were felled..

 choices  choices

cheers

 

 

 

Edited by Dan Seven
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On 2/20/2016 at 4:49 PM, Thomas said:

Exactly, in most EU countries, .223 is not allowed as a "sporting caliber" hence the adoption of .222 . You can even get 10 round Ar-15's in .222!

 

Never played with large bore express rifles- I can imagine that the recoil must be brutal!

Fun fact, the AR-15 was originally designed around the .222 Remington, untill the military decided it wasn't powerful enough, so ArmaLite took the .222, and had the neck blown out. They called it the ".222 Remington special", until the military renamed it the 5.56×45.

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On 3/4/2016 at 6:51 AM, zackmars said:

Fun fact, the AR-15 was originally designed around the .222 Remington, untill the military decided it wasn't powerful enough, so ArmaLite took the .222, and had the neck blown out. They called it the ".222 Remington special", until the military renamed it the 5.56×45.

Never knew that!

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Im not really a gun guy. But the smith & wesson, 38 'special'. Hollow tip. Works for me. I removed the original grip. And replaced it with something thicker with a pocket lip. So that i can easily carry it in a pocket. Im going to have the hammer removed. So that it doesnt snag. (got to squeeze ....dont pull) LOL

 

Edited by VagrantVic

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