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For the preppers: What made you first get involved in prepping?

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On 7/14/2015 at 7:17 PM, rockie99.rg said:

I'm new to the site but I'm a veteran who the more I watch and listen the more concerned I am.

Concerned about us or the world?

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I've been fascinated with prepping since I was a child, but I didn't have a name for it until more recent years. Ever so often over the years I would get an impulse to get things in order. More recently, I've put in a bit of money shopping for cool EDC items. It's relaxing and actually soothing to sort through my stuff and update, rearrange, etc.

I enjoy making the Altoid tin kits. A couple days ago I made a small EDC kit for a friend. I used a small zipper pouch for hers. She thanked me for caring about her supplies "in case of the apocalypse". Ha ha. :)

Sooo... as someone mentioned earlier...must be something we have or developed as a child. 

I still need to work on the house prepping. I'm always a work in progress.

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6 hours ago, Kaye :) said:

I've been fascinated with prepping since I was a child, but I didn't have a name for it until more recent years. Ever so often over the years I would get an impulse to get things in order. More recently, I've put in a bit of money shopping for cool EDC items. It's relaxing and actually soothing to sort through my stuff and update, rearrange, etc.

I enjoy making the Altoid tin kits. A couple days ago I made a small EDC kit for a friend. I used a small zipper pouch for hers. She thanked me for caring about her supplies "in case of the apocalypse". Ha ha. :)

Sooo... as someone mentioned earlier...must be something we have or developed as a child. 

I still need to work on the house prepping. I'm always a work in progress.

Kaye, show us some of these altoids kits. I love those "just how much useful items can you stuff into it" tins. I gave all mine away to family. I wish I could remember all the items. I mostly use the tins for as char/fire kits now. 

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On 12/21/2015 at 10:48 AM, Joannaelisa said:

Hmm... I'm not smart enough to edit my post. Maybe Elisa can delete that part for me?

Sorry it took me so long - didn't see this until now! Deleted that bit & where it was mentioned by Mike Ash just to be sure ;) Nice call @Mike Ash, btw!

Also, it's not about being smart enough - after a certain number of hours you're no longer able to edit your post, but administrators, etc are of course able to do so, so like you did this time, just let us know where you'd like it edited.

On 12/22/2015 at 7:40 PM, Tfire1163 said:

Concerned about us or the world?

Lol I think what was meant was concerned about the world, but I guess you can never be perfectly sure until you ask.

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On 12/27/2015 at 7:45 AM, Mike Ash said:

Kaye, show us some of these altoids kits. I love those "just how much useful items can you stuff into it" tins. I gave all mine away to family. I wish I could remember all the items. I mostly use the tins for as char/fire kits now. 

I've wanted to post pictures on here, but guess I'm a bit lazy in that area. But, I'll do it soon. Thanks for asking.

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I was kicked out of the Boy Scouts at age 13. They said I was paranoid about the apocalypse and a negative influence on others, so my brother and father started bug out preppers in 1990.

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On 12/29/2015 at 2:50 PM, striblen said:

I was kicked out of the Boy Scouts at age 13. They said I was paranoid about the apocalypse and a negative influence on others, so my brother and father started bug out preppers in 1990.

So strange. Didn't know you could get kicked out for that kind of thing.. =/

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For me it all started with an interview I heard on the radio with Jane Jacobs discussing her book 'Dark age ahead'. That was 2004 and it would be 2010 when listening to Dmitry Orlov that preparations began. Mr. Orlov pulls no punches and is of the opinion that the US, and much of the western world, will experience a collapse in due time. I tend to agree.

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Hey Eduardo..good to see You here..

Wish i had a crystal ball, save me a lot of preparations..

or maybe let me know i haven't gone far enough !

cheers..

 

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19 hours ago, Eduardo said:

For me it all started with an interview I heard on the radio with Jane Jacobs discussing her book 'Dark age ahead'. That was 2004 and it would be 2010 when listening to Dmitry Orlov that preparations began. Mr. Orlov pulls no punches and is of the opinion that the US, and much of the western world, will experience a collapse in due time. I tend to agree.

Welcome, Eduardo! Nice to have you with us.

18 hours ago, Dan Seven said:

Hey Eduardo..good to see You here..

Wish i had a crystal ball, save me a lot of preparations..

or maybe let me know i haven't gone far enough !

cheers..

 

Definitely, Dan. Completely agree.

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I've always been one of those people that tends to carry extra stuff tools food what have you just in case stuff happens i didn't really get into the whole prepper thing until 9/11 when that happened the game changed for me. but going is slow and my preps ebb and flow as my finances allow.

 

 hurricane /super storm sandy (i was living in new york at the time) reminded me that i should keep preparing for worst case shtf senarios.  my current situation is kinda a survival situation lol if it wasn't for my brother i would be homeless in fact and my only internet access is the library or my phone. and only part time work. things will get better though i am in night school for construction carpentry   and i am learning other wood working skills on my own. 

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I grew up on a farm in Southern Sask. Dirt road to town ( heavy clay soil so rain = 6 inches of sticky slick mud ) No trees that someone hadn't planted. 60Mph winds were common. Generally snowed in for a few days every year and also had days nothing moved in the mud. So we always had full freezers, a cold room full of veggies, canned food and sealed barrels of flour, sugar etc. Prepping and DIY were pretty much habit as far back as I can remember.

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I always thought about "what if ..." but only recently started prepping. Reason being the social unrest starting here being flooded by so many migrants from Africa and the Middle-East. Small riots already starting in places and I just want to be prepared to hold on for at least some time and have something to defend my family and property.

And many more people are doing so, especially women are buying pepperspray even though it is illegal.

 

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I am a newb and only getting started.  I don't consider myself a doomsday guy, but the signs of the times can't be ignored.  The world economy is a shambles, people seem to just use each other for gain (look at the divorce rate and typical office/work politics).  So many people I meet only care about themselves and would abandon their parents or children to get gain.

All that said, my job as a husband and father will not change regardless of what is going on in the world.  I need to be able to protect and provide for my wife and kids.  I am slowly but surely starting to build a bug out bag/box for home and vehicle.  Need to have food, clothing, and shelter available even if bugging out to the woods.

Any good sites y'all can recommend for info and good prices is appreciated.  I am very thankful for this forum, you that respond, and all help and advice you provide to me and others.

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@Todd  Good on You. The other boys and girls will play whatever game they want.

I am thinking that you are in a City. I work in a City and commute.

A City will be the last place on Earth i wanna be in case things go South.

No power means no water and no heating and no cooking and no gasoline and likely

communication interruptions, no computers, no access to supermarkets as they go dark

with no tills, then looting and then home invasions. Hopefully the weather is ok.

 Power can go out for a lot of reasons, even short of natural disasters.

In the country where i am, power goes out means my back up battery is handling 

my shurflo pump on the well in the basement, and i can even flush my toilets.

My woodstoves take over the heating and cooking and i do not have to worry so much

about the neighborhood threat getting desperate and wanting at my larder. No worry 

about screaming on the street or how many people are in my backyard. Good Deal.

Bugging Out is an attempt at getting to someplace with water and shelter and where a

person can fend for themselves to be left the "F" alone till it is time to dig in.

Anyways, my basic lowdown. No one is your enemy till they get hungry or thirsty, then they

start acting like cannibals. We are the alpha predator on the planet and all Life our quarry.

cheers

 

Edited by Dan Seven
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I guess I got into it because I always thought it was interesting and it was the best thing on tv when I was little. I always liked the idea of going out into the middle of nowhere and being able to live there just like you were at home. If something bad ever happened you could just walk off into the woods and never be seen again till you wanted to come home. Or if you got lost somewhere you would know how to get back, or at least to someone who could help. My dad is interested too so we actually have something to talk about.

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I live in a suburb of Indianapolis.  I'm not too far in town to where I couldn't get out quickly.  Been thinking about halting the stockpiles for a bit and finding some wooded land in middle of know where.  Could then build something there designed to be off the grid.  I do like idea of back up battery and the pump for the well.  That and the wood burning stove give you huge advantage.  With a good food stockpile and some self def options ypu are set for a long while.

Ive been thinking of trying to find a way to network with legit local preppers and have a multi family strategy.  Strength in numbers mentality.  Not sure exactly how to go about it and who I can trust, but thinking about it.

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@Todd  I like the idea of strength in numbers. What concerns me is the work ethic that

these days leaves a lot to be desired. For instance, a lot would volunteer to go hunting

or fishing, fewer still to chop wood or wash clothes. It is easy to man a post, not so easy

to weed a garden, crush berries or butchering, milk a cow at sun up, take an hour shift

churning butter, clean a chicken coop, plow with a horse, cut hay by hand, knead bread.

Everyone wants to be the boss so they can run their mouth instead of their muscles.

Better be a good crew. My neighbors are pretty good survivors, but i got one that would 

rather drink all day, though he grows a good garden and is very good at fishing too.

cheers

 

 

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Agree completely...  I guess if we believed much in our neighbors (and humanity) we wouldn't need to prep.  I'm not going to push religion on anyone, but if we all loved our neighbor as ourselves think what a great place the world would be.

I think I'd still want to collect nice knives (mostly Spyderco) just for fun.  

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2 hours ago, Dan Seven said:

@Todd  I like the idea of strength in numbers. What concerns me is the work ethic that

these days leaves a lot to be desired. For instance, a lot would volunteer to go hunting

or fishing, fewer still to chop wood or wash clothes. It is easy to man a post, not so easy

to weed a garden, crush berries or butchering, milk a cow at sun up, take an hour shift

churning butter, clean a chicken coop, plow with a horse, cut hay by hand, knead bread.

Everyone wants to be the boss so they can run their mouth instead of their muscles.

Better be a good crew. My neighbors are pretty good survivors, but i got one that would 

rather drink all day, though he grows a good garden and is very good at fishing too.

cheers

 

 

26 years ago I was planting trees with most of the other planters quite literally being half my age. We had maybe 25% quit in the first week as it wasn't the easy money they thought it would be. I'm not sure I'd attribute that to work ethic so much as unrealistic expectations. I know I hurt lots for the first two weeks, and I expect the younger ones did for at least a few days too, but most of them got past that and stuck out the two months of planting. ( Ps after two months planting trees you would be amazed at how much you can do, running, lifting etc. )

I trust my neighbours lots, but it's a very rural area so we all aren't that far removed from subsistence farming. Most of us trade with each other already. City life, I sort of knew the people living either side of me, and pretty sure one set was stealing when they wanted.

 

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@Gary_Gough  I like what You are saying. My neighbor would be half cut, but he would have no qualms picking up a shotgun to keep undesirables at bay. If he was not tending to his garden or his Still, he could be found beside the Lake fishing.

These are desirable and undesirable traits. I would definitely have him around, as we are good neighbors and borrow back and forth, and WE have learned to be dependent on ways we can trust each other for, and learned to avoid extending what which we can't be trusted for.

This has taken many years to accomplish !

I for one hate to be trusted with that which i cannot trust myself !  

It was a heavy messenger that once said.. "Lead us not into temptation"

or as the late Nancy Reagan put it     " Just say No "

cheers

Edited by Dan Seven
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On 4/26/2016 at 0:30 AM, BimbleThunk said:

I guess I got into it because I always thought it was interesting and it was the best thing on tv when I was little. I always liked the idea of going out into the middle of nowhere and being able to live there just like you were at home. If something bad ever happened you could just walk off into the woods and never be seen again till you wanted to come home. Or if you got lost somewhere you would know how to get back, or at least to someone who could help. My dad is interested too so we actually have something to talk about.

This idea fascinated me since I was a kid, too. There's just something freeing about the idea that you'd be able to live on your own in the middle of nowhere. I'm still nowhere near that level (my bushcraft skills are terrible; lucky to have Thomas around to help teach me those ;)), but it's a nice goal to have.

 

On 4/27/2016 at 5:17 AM, Gary_Gough said:

I'm not sure I'd attribute that to work ethic so much as unrealistic expectations. I know I hurt lots for the first two weeks, and I expect the younger ones did for at least a few days too, but most of them got past that and stuck out the two months of planting. ( Ps after two months planting trees you would be amazed at how much you can do, running, lifting etc. )

This makes perfect sense to me. Why there are a lot of couch potato preppers (myself included on the vast majority of days). Easier to stockpile than it is to do physical work to get your preps to be where they need to be.

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