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Elise

How Would You/Have You Prepared for a House Fire?

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House fires are actually something I think about a lot with regards to prepping, especially in particular when it comes to protecting the things that I just cannot replace by going into a store. Things like family pictures would not be life or death if lost, but regardless, it would really hurt to lose them, especially when it could have been prevented by the images being digitalized and uploaded to something like Dropbox or Google Drive.

I'm sure that some of you have separate storage facilities that carry your preps, and others have family members that are also into prepping that would be able to help you back on your feet in case of a house fire, but what other ways have you gone about prepping for a situation where you did have a house fire? Of course prevention is the best medicine, so we've done a lot in the past about making sure we're up to spec with regards to fire code - but there's also no point in ignoring the fact that it could happen.

Let me know! Really interested in hearing what you do & what you'd like to do to prepare for this kind of emergency!

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A house fire scares me too. Can't imagine how devastating it would be to stand there, not being able to do anything about it as you watch your home and everything you own burn away. I think about it often. But the reality is unless you can afford two residences, both being furnished and stocked with duplicates of everything, there's not a whole lot you can do about loosing everything in a fire except start again from scratch. The biggest thing is not to have a fire in the first place.
I'm no expert, but I do think about fire prevention. I know that having my furnace inspected every year before winter may point out problems that could cause a fire or carbon monoxide poisoning. I clean out my dryer vents every so often to prevent excessive build ups of lint that could end up catching on fire. I installed a sprinkler system in my kitchen in the event a fire starts there. A buddy of mine is an electrician and he comes over to my house and checks out my electrical system in the house. I also have smoke detectors and fire extinguishers in every room.......... and I keep flammables stored in a special cabinet that contains fire in the event of ignition of flammable gases or liquids, or I keep flammables outside the house....... There's probably allot of things I miss, like I said, I'm no expert. But I do what I know I can do.
Perhaps one of the biggest things we can do is be safe in the things we do. If you smoke, be careful. If you're cooking, be careful. Think about the consequences of what you are doing should you make a mistake...........
I don't know what the statistics are about what starts the most fire in homes, but I'm sure that if studied you'd probably find that most fires could have been prevented.................
There are storage facilities, some climate controlled, that you can put prepping supplies in. I don't have one. Perhaps I should check how much it would be to rent one. At least if you have a rented storage unit starting over may not be so hard. Or even build a detached building on your premises that is located where a house fire is least likely to affect it. I don't have that either. But you may want to have that climate controlled too.
I guess I'm just praying that fire prevention will do it..............

Edited by PappyHiker
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Two foot diameter fire under the main stairs when I noticed it. 5 minutes later and I would have been going up to the third floor and taking a rope to the ground. I no longer buy fans with plastic blades. At the time pure luck, I'd gotten called to work, noticed the flames on the way down stairs, unplugged the fan, threw a pot of water over it, and tossed it and the floor boards under it out the back door and headed to work.

DSC_0532sm.JPG

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What I have, escape routes, but a stairwell fire is worst. Smash a window and jump is the last resort. Shop has an insulated room with an electric heater, spare couch and sleeping bag, so place to go even in winter. So assuming not dead from smoke, it would be time to decide what to do after the fire burned out. Local fire dept. takes 30 mins or more to arrive, so after everything is over.

Rural life and fires are like that, had an old friend living 20 minutes outside of Regina. His place caught fire, he yelled to his wife on the second floor to grab their son and go out a window. Took a few months for the ice to melt to find his body in what had been the basement.

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A house fire scares me too. Can't imagine how devastating it would be to stand there, not being able to do anything about it as you watch your home and everything you own burn away.

Omg you just summed my deepest fear up. :( Horrifying to imagine.

Or even build a detached building on your premises that is located where a house fire is least likely to affect it.

[...]

I guess I'm just praying that fire prevention will do it..............

Building a detached building on your premises is a great idea! Like a shed or even a detached garage would be a good idea.

And I wouldn't dream of knocking fire prevention as an excellent method of prepping for house fires. Though I don't know the statistics either, I'm quite confident that you're right about most fires being ones that could have been prevented. That being said, being quite a klutz myself, I of course do feel that accidents happen sometimes - it's sadly so difficult to prevent all of them. :(

Two foot diameter fire under the main stairs when I noticed it. 5 minutes later and I would have been going up to the third floor and taking a rope to the ground. I no longer buy fans with plastic blades. At the time pure luck, I'd gotten called to work, noticed the flames on the way down stairs, unplugged the fan, threw a pot of water over it, and tossed it and the floor boards under it out the back door and headed to work.

DSC_0532sm.JPG

That is crazy :S So close to being a complete disaster. :(

Rural life and fires are like that, had an old friend living 20 minutes outside of Regina. His place caught fire, he yelled to his wife on the second floor to grab their son and go out a window. Took a few months for the ice to melt to find his body in what had been the basement.

Blood curdling :(. Honestly one of my worst nightmares... That poor man. At least he was able to save his wife and son.

Escape routes, escape routes, escape routes. Especially in those basements!

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Exactly right..  Some people are fans of putting up security bars on basement windows

with no forethought as to  how they would out from the inside in case of fire..watch out for that. 

Some hinged systems have "keys" that are kept too far away from the actual cage if the time comes.

yikes..

 

 

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Exactly right..  Some people are fans of putting up security bars on basement windows

with no forethought as to  how they would out from the inside in case of fire..watch out for that. 

Some hinged systems have "keys" that are kept too far away from the actual cage if the time comes.

yikes..

 

 

Good point :S

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I followw the rule of always having a key inserted and ready to quickly unlock apartment doors, as I always lived in the building. Our doors are not the american type doors seen in movies which are immediately locked from the outside if you close them, they actually have to be locked from the inside by turning the key. Many people over here don't have more copies of keys and often lock their family members inside the house if going somewhere, and some lock the door from inside and place the key somewhere far away from doors. If fire happens, the option of getting out of apartment through doors would be impossible, and that is often an only option on high floors.

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I followw the rule of always having a key inserted and ready to quickly unlock apartment doors, as I always lived in the building. Our doors are not the american type doors seen in movies which are immediately locked from the outside if you close them, they actually have to be locked from the inside by turning the key. Many people over here don't have more copies of keys and often lock their family members inside the house if going somewhere, and some lock the door from inside and place the key somewhere far away from doors. If fire happens, the option of getting out of apartment through doors would be impossible, and that is often an only option on high floors.

This is a good tip. I was strongly considering getting those kinds of locks, as they're convenient in case you forget to lock the door behind you. Those I know who have them usually do exactly what you've said - have a spare key in the door just in case. You're right, it's really important in case of a fire!

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We have a well thought out plan, including where to go and what to bring. We also test the plan (when the boy was younger about once a month) now about every quarter at 18 I hope he has it memorized by now. We have 25 lbs (anything smaller and you've wasted your money) fire extinguishers in the kitchen, garage, hallway and have trained with the fire department on there proper use. P (pull) A (aim) S (squeeze) S (sweep)..... Don't have a plan start one today.

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One idea is that fires start in the kitchen...grease getting out of control or other things. A BIG box of Baking Soda in the Fridge absorbs odors and in a pinch is an excellent quench for grease or other fires that may arise there..

Anyway ..dual purpose, it sits there doing one job till needed for another.

cheers

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One idea is that fires start in the kitchen...grease getting out of control or other things. A BIG box of Baking Soda in the Fridge absorbs odors and in a pinch is an excellent quench for grease or other fires that may arise there..

Anyway ..dual purpose, it sits there doing one job till needed for another.

cheers

Never thought about that - good point!

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