Elise

What do you think are the 5 most basic survival skills?

48 posts in this topic

I third that bet !

He seems to be 'settling' in for the long haul..and at 6'4 240 lbs (or thereabouts) can afford to go on less..as he mentions, 2 meals a day burning 2500 calories or so they said.

2‌ days a go was a news story on CTV about a fella that got mauled by a grizzly(with cubs) on central coast BC.

When she came back to finish the job he laid the boots to her nose till she quit. The bigger the boots maybe the better.

Anything can happen of course, do not want to see any of the fellas hurt, and these big predators are territorial..

I have definitely learned a few things from this show..

 

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2‌ days a go was a news story on CTV about a fella that got mauled by a grizzly(with cubs) on central coast BC.

When she came back to finish the job he laid the boots to her nose till she quit. The bigger the boots maybe the better.

Oof. That's rough.

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1. Learn the skills to obtain food/water/fire/shelter/signal; they will keep you alive, bottom line. Invest in your chosen profession; swallow the foolish pride and admit that you still have something to learn (and always will).

2. Establish a daily pattern for survival; there is comfort in pattern and repetition, even in an uncomfortable situation.

3. Know yourself (physically, psychologically and spiritually) and your limitations; it's easy to sit at a desk and be an expert. A few days in the wilderness with nothing but your wits will make even the most devout Atheist invoke the name of God, and being stranded in a strange place will make the hardest men (and women) question themselves and their resolve, sometimes to a fatal end. Being self-aware and confident in that "self" will see you through dark days.

4. Commit yourself to using the knowledge that will save your life when you least expect it. Quitting on yourself should never be an option; your attitude should be that of "hurdling the weak to advance and trampling the dead."

5. Value the fact that you are alive and (hopefully) ambulatory; don't blame yourself for your situation. "Most people who die in the wild will die of shame." 

 

If all else fails, remember that hair is not digestible. Fingernails ARE, however, and should be bitten off and consumed as they grow...

Edited by WiseGuy
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Establish a daily pattern for survival; there is comfort in pattern and repetition, even in an uncomfortable situation.

I actually really love this point. Spot on.

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Lets start with the rule of 3s...

3 minutes without air

3 hours without shelter

3 days without water

3 weeks without food.

So playing off of that I would say the five skills that beginners need to learn are as follows.

1. Shelter Building

2. Fire Starting

3. Water procurement

4. Hunting/Trapping/Fishing

5. Basic First Aid

But everyone might disagree with me  :)

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ok...I really wanted to sound out what the others had to say here first.

When I was a child it was better for me to get lost than stay at home.

The reasons are consequential, but in getting lost were to remain found.

Nothing sad about it. We all have our hand to play, and Nature was my Ace

in the hole. It remains that way to the present moment.

1. Accept that not only are You a part of Nature, it is a part of You.

When in Nature, it is for us to understand that we are welcome as all Life is.

It is a lot to fathom, but it is as true that we have our own Nature, and coming to

grips with this fact is the very lesson that Nature has to teach us, and it will happen.

2. In accepting that we are a part of Nature we must act Purposely. We will learn

that we were Made, and it is Arrogance to think that We 'made ourselves'. We

will soon get that in Nature, Life itself, does not think that way, and it makes us more

Natural people. The 'create your own reality' crowd will soon mellow into the

understanding that despite their own 'creative' efforts', Nature changes us, far more

than we change 'it', to the understanding, that we have our bounds within created/ creative

"Purpose'. Those Artists within nature, eager to come up with the Inspiration of their Being,

will soon learn, that knowing the difference between the "Creative' elements in Nature, that

they are only allotted the ones that will allow their personal inspiration within it, not out of it.

Being the Creative Director is oxmoronic within Nature. Only Purpose will come of it.

3. Finding a 'Home' and 'Purpose' within Nature, and the derived Naturalness that is the result, will allow Us to question our 'Significance'. Without Significance, our moments within Nature, will be thrown against each other, as though they were created equally. This is not the case, as each moment within Life is not just to show us the way Home, or our own Purpose.

Moments within Life have no consequence to what we can predict, and we must try to follow the plot within the Story, to gain context as to what those moments are pointing towards.

Without this we will feel no Sacredness within our Existence, no matter how at home or Purposeful we feel Life is. Each moment contains the clue to the Spirit and Heart of our Being, and we want to feel the Sacredness, when it occurs, as in those Moments we get Life Loves Us.

4. Having established Home and Purpose and Sacredness in Nature, we may begin to have the understanding of Quality. Quality is a form of Quantity, not that it asks 'How Much', but that it asks 'How Good'. If we are missing 'How good' we will always be in competition with Nature.

Always wondering ' good enough'. As Sacredness may fail to be learned in Nature, it is logical that "Better than 'Sacred' may be a default result. Go back to Nature and learn 'Sacred' again, is my advice. that we do not fall into the trap, that we have a 'missing quality' ; to not make us feel Sacred. 'Life is Sacred'. this is an Ancient Truth. We need to  'take this' as Granted.

If we Believe that this is not to be taken as Granted, we will take Life for Granted.

There is no Quality in Not taking Life as granted. Admit that, and revert to a (1) Sacred moment.

If it was Granted..do not make make the mistake that it was by You.

5. Quantity means Order. Within Establishment of Quality in Life, in our cessation within

becoming 'more better' we become more Ourselves. This in an advantage that condenses

to a 'Mastery in Minimalism', which is the only aspect we need to Maximize our true Nature.

How little is How much too..

Simply Much , is different than more better, as it is a release of personal judgement of what is good and reverts to what is more impersonal, to the advantage of being more in Oneself.

Being One Self is to know our Order among Things..

6. The last key to Survival..is 2 keys in 1. There is a difference between Being Worthy and Worthless. Establishing this is paramount. No longer do We need to "Earn our Place' in

Nature if You recognize our Birthright within it. Entitlement. The 'Apprenticeship' ends there.

Being Worthless means digging in the Dirt. It is within the Elements there of, that We may

define our "More Worth", as Every Ancestor was brought forth, and so Returned has sought.

We bear the Pain of All those in Our Tree that fell from It. May Your Seed fall in Fertile Soil.

These keys to Me are the factors that I follow to allow my Spirit to Survive within Nature.

Free Your Spirit   Your Ass will follow..

 

 

 

Edited by Dan Seven
forgot sumthin
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#1 The will to survive!!!  Without this, no equipment or skill will save you.
#2 Be prepared, if you have no equipment and no skill your chances of survival lessens.  I you have a pocket knife, matches something that can hold water you have increased your chances exponentially.
#3 The ability to make fire and know how to keep the fire going
#4 Know where to locate water and how to purify it.
#5 Being able to build a shelter that can keep you dry and warm is a life saver.

 

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Thanks Rowan:

Here is a thread that both of our Father's would like..nothing but matches..

Not sure what gun your dad would use..

Here is an interesting gun and matches video..

cheers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dear Dan,

That is cool!!!  I wondered how long it took him to make that.  A truly ingenious design.

I have seen an African “rock gun” that is used to shoot birds, but this is at a different level altogether.

Tempted to try making one, but not worth the penalty if I succeed but I say again, that is cool!!!

Kind regards,

Rowan H. Robbertze

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Thanks Rowan:

Here is a thread that both of our Father's would like..nothing but matches..

Not sure what gun your dad would use..

Here is an interesting gun and matches video..

cheers

 

That is absolutely crazy, I can't believe how well it works! I wonder what the legalities around our neck of the woods are when it comes to experimental stuff like this...

Edited by Thomas
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That is a very good question. Old flintlocks fall out of the rulebook.   According to Mounties Website:

All matchlock, flintlock and wheel lock long guns are considered antiques no matter when they were made. Like older firearms of these types, they are exempt from the licence and registration requirements set out in the Firearms Act.

The ignition is like the powder pan in a flintlock, with "powder" (ground matches) externally fusing the internal "powder" charge, as the bent nail strikes the charge, steel on the "flint', being the brisance explosive. Except no pan, just a drilled hole to hold it in.

It is still necessary to store it in a proper locked safe, or closet, preferably with a metal door.

Ammo in this case, does not matter, and the "Powder", well, wherever One stores their matches out of reach of kids..

 

 

 

 

 

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Lady E,

You ask for 5 BASIC skill sets. I think of this task as the beginning of an outline. As with any outline it expands to sub-categories. And them into sub-sub categories etc.  There is some overlap but I think these 5 do well as the basics.

Hunting:

     Water, Food, Fire Materials, Shelter Materials,

Body:

      Temp Control, First Aid, Proactive Activities

Fire:

      Site, Starting, Maintaining, Extinguishing

Awareness:

      Weather, Predators, Rations Allowance, Distances, Rescue,  

Construction:

      Shelter, Fire, Food, Water

PJL ___________________________________________________________________________

                                 Having a bad idea  ~~  Can be worse than having no idea at all.

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Building fires.
Building shelters.
Signaling ( communication ).
Finding food and water.
First aid.
There is so much more to that because each one of these skills require some sub skills before you can achieve success in a survival situation. For instance in order for you to build a fire you must first know about gathering tinder and procuring burnable wood. You must know how to use a ferro rod, or flint and steel, or a bow drill. Before you use a bow drill you must learn how to make one..... etc............ The same goes for building shelters, signaling, finding food and water, and applying first aid. There are a sub set of skills needed for each basic survival need.
But this is only 5 basic skills....... others come into play just as much, like the psychology of survival.
Knowing your situation also is important in prioritizing your survival needs at any specific time. ie, there is no need for a fire or shelter at 10am if it is sunny and 60+ degrees, that can wait until you procure food and water, or signal for help etc.
I guess what I'm saying is that survival is so much more complex than spouting off 5 basic skills. But the above listed are mine....... the ones I learned in my youth as a scout.

 

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This is very good topic. I've been asked this by some of the Boy Scouts I've taught. -Shelter Building! This is most important to me. If it's dark and search teams aren't out looking or the weather has turned bad at least you're dry and somewhat warm till weather permits a fire. -Fire! Without a pack with purifying tablets this is only way to guarantee clean water, as well as cooking, and rescue. -Water! Knowing how to obtain water isn't always as easy as going to the creek and taking a plunge. What if you can clearly tell that a pool of water is highly contaminated with animal scat. Knowing simple water solar still and collecting water from bamboo can safe your life -Food! Pretty self explanatory. Without food you loose energy and will to survive. But to a newcomer in wilderness food in their mind is war paint, woodsman bow with stone chipped arrowheads taking a deer. As we know that doesn't happen. So collecting wild edibles and simple snares is what a beginner should focus on. -First Aid! This is very important as if you are hurt and can't continue chances or being found are reduced. Also knowledge of simple wild plants to aid in stomach aches and such are great tools. All of these are no better than the last. And also this all depends of the situation. If this is a camping hike gone wrong then these skills will suite well. But in a hostile environment then stealth would have to be on the list.

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This is very good topic. I've been asked this by some of the Boy Scouts I've taught. -Shelter Building! This is most important to me. If it's dark and search teams aren't out looking or the weather has turned bad at least you're dry and somewhat warm till weather permits a fire. -Fire! Without a pack with purifying tablets this is only way to guarantee clean water, as well as cooking, and rescue. -Water! Knowing how to obtain water isn't always as easy as going to the creek and taking a plunge. What if you can clearly tell that a pool of water is highly contaminated with animal scat. Knowing simple water solar still and collecting water from bamboo can safe your life -Food! Pretty self explanatory. Without food you loose energy and will to survive. But to a newcomer in wilderness food in their mind is war paint, woodsman bow with stone chipped arrowheads taking a deer. As we know that doesn't happen. So collecting wild edibles and simple snares is what a beginner should focus on. -First Aid! This is very important as if you are hurt and can't continue chances or being found are reduced. Also knowledge of simple wild plants to aid in stomach aches and such are great tools. All of these are no better than the last. And also this all depends of the situation. If this is a camping hike gone wrong then these skills will suite well. But in a hostile environment then stealth would have to be on the list.

Very good ones, Josh. And welcome to Survival Threads! :)

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I haven't seen show "Alone", but sounds pretty cool.

I watched the guys explanation video. I respect that he said he was providing for his family. It's a wild world no matter where you are. :)

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ALSO, about the FIVE skills. I would think:

Fire & Water to be almost equals.

Shelter would be next whether built or found.

Food--Well...personally, I'd consider at least the first 72 hours to be a good time to start a diet. :)

 

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if you are not LIVING in the wilderness, there's far more important survival skills to master, like a truly swift draw of the pistol from concealment, hand to hand, use of cover, use of a light with the gun. you can screw up many things, for many hours or days in the woods, and still be ok. But if you can't respond to an attack, effectively, by dogs or men,  in a fraction of a second, it will probably be too late. also, what you do will be scrutinized by the legal system. Nobody is going to care what you did to survive the wilderness threat.

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not really a skill. Just good sense. Dont go "out there" without proper gear/knowledge. Know how to locate yourself, know to take a rental satellite phone. Know to leave your travel intentions with a couple, not just one, reliable person, along with the date you expect to return. People get into trouble by shifts in weather, wildfires, flood, avalanches, yes, but mostly by not having sense enough to realize that stuff CAN happen and you'd better have plans and gear ready to handle such stuff, or don't be out there (especially not alone)

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Posted (edited)

The POTTERY, cause this include fire making (stone boonfire, cooking firestove, kiln), geography to find clay, building shelter from clay this kind learn from making the small kiln too, earthenware fence, forge kiln. Charcoal making, open pitfire, water purification earthenware, bowl, urn (unlimited molotov bomb), water earthenware storage, spoon, earthenware fishing hook, earthenware shield and armor, glass kiln, 

HERBALIST, herbal/ plants recordnization/ Foraging, Medicine Formula, Sanitation, lye, oil making, soap, candle, salt from plant from clear water weeds from river or lake, glue/ resin/ rubber, tars and toxic material

Woodcrafter/Bushcrafter, make thread, rope, waveing make a basket or bag, net/ gil net. Watermill, or windmill, boat and raft, temporal shelter, knots, wooden hamer/mallet, making of traps, staff, spear, bow and arrows, 

Blacksmith, ore or mineral recordnaztion/ finding ore/ ore foraging/magnetite stone finding, ore smelting, forge/forging metal, simple metal traps, chain, wire making, nails, metal fishing hook, simple lock making, simple knife, simple sword /machete, simple axe, simple hammer, simple anvil, simple shield and armor, if can make simple gun and bullet,  etc

Material arts and militer strategies for self defense and fitness

 

Edited by Daimond25
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Knowledge,

How to Build Shelters (using any available resources),

How to Make Fire,

How to Source Water and Make it Safe,

How to Source Food

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On ‎2015‎-‎07‎-‎08 at 5:25 AM, Thomas said:

Thats a pretty excellent list. I would go with;

  1. Situational awareness.
  2. Trapping/Fishing
  3. Ability to control panic/fear
  4. Building structures/improvising your environment.
  5. Fire making.

Pretty much covers it for me too. Especially the improvising part. You might have to break out the old ingenuity and MacGyver yourself something to make things better for you. Like a wheelbarrow.

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