Elise

Ideal climate for wilderness survival?

32 posts in this topic

Let's just say, hypothetically speaking, that you had to survive in the wilderness for a whole year, but that you could choose absolutely anywhere in the world to do it.

Where would you choose?

Now I know that some of you live in climates very specific to where you are, and are thus very experienced in the type of climate you've lived in, and thus would choose that, but as a secondary question, what if you had no prior experience in your own environment? Then what kind of a climate would you choose?

 

So two questions:

  1. With the experience you have, which kind of climate would you pick as ideal for you to survive in for a year.
  2. If you had no climate-specific survival experience, then which climate would you choose (essentially, which climate do you think is the ultimate ideal for wilderness survival)?


I personally have no idea how to answer this question myself, so I'm curious to see what everyone's responses will be like!

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Dear Elise,

Where would I choose,… Black Forrest in Germany.  Did a day hike through a piece of it and LOVED it!!!  Want to experience it in full.

As for asking locals when the best time is, that is also depending on their likes.  If they love winter and snow, they will say that the time to go.
 
If I do not know the environment, I would choose spring.  Would think in most places this will mean ample food and as I have 0% experience with cold weather survival, spring should be fine.  What I view as cold weather most will see as a lovely summer’s day.  I will also presume that water will be more abundant in spring.

With my experience and equipment, I believe spring would be most suited to my survival needs/experience.  I would best cope with what nature will give and what it will dish out.

In reality I would be more worried about the locals and their laws.  Maybe making a fire is not allowed and you wind up in jail.  Having a knife with you maybe considered hostile and again, jail.  Now a days it is not nature that worries me, it is the people around it that is the concern.

I trust this is what you were looking for.

Kind regards,
Rowan H. Robbertze

 

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Weather. Its all chance and no choice.
I thought about this question for a while now, wondering about my ideal climate for survival. But I don't know that such a place exists.
It would never drop below 50 at night, and never go higher than 75 during the day. I don't mind rain very much at all, in fact, I think rain can be an asset. Don't have to worry about finding water. Plus rain keeps the vegetation growing, so food is less of an issue. So rain maybe once a week would be nice. And perhaps a days length of light isn't necessarily a part of climate, I do like it when you have 12 hours + of daylight.
And most definitely a place that doesn't have any earthquakes, flooding, volcanoes, or tornadoes. Hurricanes, well thats another story because I've had this fantasy for years now about riding out a hurricane. I love storms for some strange reason, so much so that when we have a storm I go into our little dormer room and listen to the rain hitting the roof and feel the thunder rumble throughout my body. Lightning is also a big thrill when I'm in the room. I can fall asleep there during a storm, and have done so many times. Mare says I'm weird, maybe so......... But we seldom get storms in this area, and if we do they are short lived. But riding out a hurricane is on my bucket list of things to do. What a thrill that would be.
Anyway, those are my climate ideals. Not sure that place exists. Years ago I researched areas in both North and South America thinking that such a place exists and found that I'd be lucky if only part of a year would meet my demands. Seasonal changes can put a hamper on ones long term survival. I guess that's why Native Americans ( Indians for those less politically correct ) migrated north and south during the year way back when.
But even if my ideal climate place does exist, how long would it last? I don't believe in Global Warming, but I do see that there is a global shift in weather patterns. These shifts have been going on throughout the life of the planet. So climate stability is another key factor for my ideal climate..............
Can anybody tell me if my place exists??????
BTW. I have experienced the weather extremes in places I've traveled to in the past, but not survival related. I've experienced desert heat and sub-zero Arctic cold. I was in Kansas one summer when a line of tornadoes came rolling thru, and on the banks of the Old Miss when floods were occurring. I even felt a couple of small tremors one year when I was in Southern Cal. But those short lived experiences told me that I do not want part of this as the climate I would find desirable.
Like I said, weather is all chance and no choice.

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Guanacaste Province in Costa Rica..Pacific Slope..

Climate is pretty much ideal, folks are generally really nice.

If a person buys property...NEVER LEAVE...squatters are a nightmare..

Food is hanging from the trees..Ocean full of fish..watch out for falling coconuts. Spent many months there and it is a beautiful place..

May want to learn a few words in Spanish..

buenos..

Edited by Dan Seven
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Dear Elise,

Where would I choose,… Black Forrest in Germany.  Did a day hike through a piece of it and LOVED it!!!  Want to experience it in full.

As for asking locals when the best time is, that is also depending on their likes.  If they love winter and snow, they will say that the time to go.
 
If I do not know the environment, I would choose spring.  Would think in most places this will mean ample food and as I have 0% experience with cold weather survival, spring should be fine.  What I view as cold weather most will see as a lovely summer’s day.  I will also presume that water will be more abundant in spring.

With my experience and equipment, I believe spring would be most suited to my survival needs/experience.  I would best cope with what nature will give and what it will dish out.

In reality I would be more worried about the locals and their laws.  Maybe making a fire is not allowed and you wind up in jail.  Having a knife with you maybe considered hostile and again, jail.  Now a days it is not nature that worries me, it is the people around it that is the concern.

I trust this is what you were looking for.

Kind regards,
Rowan H. Robbertze

 

Yes I would choose spring or summer. That being said, I purposefully said you'd have to survive for a year so that you couldn't choose the best season sneakily and only happen to be there for that ;). If you had to choose the entire year in Black Forrest in Germany, would that still be the place you chose?

And let's say, hypothetically speaking, that there were no people around and no laws - just for this hypothetical haha. Cause that's another story altogether!

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Weather. Its all chance and no choice.
I thought about this question for a while now, wondering about my ideal climate for survival. But I don't know that such a place exists.
It would never drop below 50 at night, and never go higher than 75 during the day. I don't mind rain very much at all, in fact, I think rain can be an asset. Don't have to worry about finding water. Plus rain keeps the vegetation growing, so food is less of an issue. So rain maybe once a week would be nice. And perhaps a days length of light isn't necessarily a part of climate, I do like it when you have 12 hours + of daylight.
And most definitely a place that doesn't have any earthquakes, flooding, volcanoes, or tornadoes. Hurricanes, well thats another story because I've had this fantasy for years now about riding out a hurricane. I love storms for some strange reason, so much so that when we have a storm I go into our little dormer room and listen to the rain hitting the roof and feel the thunder rumble throughout my body. Lightning is also a big thrill when I'm in the room. I can fall asleep there during a storm, and have done so many times. Mare says I'm weird, maybe so......... But we seldom get storms in this area, and if we do they are short lived. But riding out a hurricane is on my bucket list of things to do. What a thrill that would be.
Anyway, those are my climate ideals. Not sure that place exists. Years ago I researched areas in both North and South America thinking that such a place exists and found that I'd be lucky if only part of a year would meet my demands. Seasonal changes can put a hamper on ones long term survival. I guess that's why Native Americans ( Indians for those less politically correct ) migrated north and south during the year way back when.
But even if my ideal climate place does exist, how long would it last? I don't believe in Global Warming, but I do see that there is a global shift in weather patterns. These shifts have been going on throughout the life of the planet. So climate stability is another key factor for my ideal climate..............
Can anybody tell me if my place exists??????
BTW. I have experienced the weather extremes in places I've traveled to in the past, but not survival related. I've experienced desert heat and sub-zero Arctic cold. I was in Kansas one summer when a line of tornadoes came rolling thru, and on the banks of the Old Miss when floods were occurring. I even felt a couple of small tremors one year when I was in Southern Cal. But those short lived experiences told me that I do not want part of this as the climate I would find desirable.
Like I said, weather is all chance and no choice.

That's really interesting! I'm sure you'd get such a rush from successfully running out a hurricane. Let us know if you ever do try.

Wish I knew enough about the world's climates to tell you if your ideal exists somewhere right now.

I don't think I could possibly survive successfully in a desert.. lack of water would be my main concern with anything survival related and I feel I'd definitely rather a rain forest over a desert. I'm also horrid with the cold, but cause I live in Canada I can more imagine surviving in sub-zero temperatures than deserts where rain is sparse. That being said, would really rather neither of course!

Weather is definitely all chance and no choice. Really like that btw.

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Guanacaste Province in Costa Rica..Pacific Slope..

Climate is pretty much ideal, folks are generally really nice.

If a person buys property...NEVER LEAVE...squatters are a nightmare..

Food is hanging from the trees..Ocean full of fish..watch out for falling coconuts. Spent many months there and it is a beautiful place..

May want to learn a few words in Spanish..

buenos..

I've heard squatters are a huge problem in Costa Rica. Such a beautiful place and I agree it's not far from ideal there. Definitely would want to learn a few words in Spanish if you're going to talk to locals, but in terms of surviving on your own, completely doable.

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Used to own some property down there and did my time with lawyers and with squatters..

Being an absentee landlord is a dreadful risk..

Having said that, if a person means to stay and cultivates trust relationships with locals to live in one's home if absent, under contract, it is possible to leave for awhile. Otherwise, you may be left homeless.

If the Country had proper real estate laws and protections, i would find it difficult to fault the place otherwise, as it is truly a delightful place to live, impossible to freeze or starve or bake..

Of course there are pluses and minuses to every locale, and my bias is towards the tropical..

I am not complaining about where i live, and the disadvantages of climactic inclemency are the only real survival issues facing me here, other than the vagaries of the human condition..

It is important when looking for a place on this earth to do a little soul searching, if a person believes they may be possession of one.

If they are reasonably convinced that they do, then it is fitting to ask if our environment is causing us pain. This is easy as the definition of pain is anything that you have as an excuse for not living.

No one can stop the Winter in Canada. If we complain (an excuse for it), we are sharing pain, and it is not possible to share pain without giving it, that is, if one indeed has a soul.

So, souls have legs, and if the geography is not amenable, it is preferable to move on, perhaps to a place where there are no excuses for living our lives. 

This is positive approach to determine whether or not we are an emigre, or seeking refuge from our own pain as a refugee.

I am not knocking people with pain. Just talking about living with it, or not.

So, those not in possession of a soul are off the hook, and please kindly disregard this post..

 

 

Edited by Dan Seven
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Yes I would choose spring or summer. That being said, I purposefully said you'd have to survive for a year so that you couldn't choose the best season sneakily and only happen to be there for that ;). If you had to choose the entire year in Black Forrest in Germany, would that still be the place you chose?

And let's say, hypothetically speaking, that there were no people around and no laws - just for this hypothetical haha. Cause that's another story altogether!

Dear Elise,

Hypothetically no people, no laws,...  If I can bring my dog I would life there 4 eva!!!  LOL

Other good thing about starting of in spring is it shows you the good, helping to get you ready for the bad.

Would love to see how far I could make it.  Never tried snow and knowing it will be on the way could be very exciting!  But will be a HUGE challenge!  Will need a wardrobe I have never owned and try skills I have only read about.  But yes would love to live there for a whole 12months.

Kind regards,
Rowan H. Robbertze

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Hey Rowan:

Spent 4 or 5 weeks in this area back in 2000, and it is lovely there.

I particularly enjoyed the Swabian Alps, and the beer and food.

Edited by Dan Seven
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So two questions:

  1. With the experience you have, which kind of climate would you pick as ideal for you to survive in for a year.
  2. If you had no climate-specific survival experience, then which climate would you choose (essentially, which climate do you think is the ultimate ideal for wilderness survival)?


 

So many trade offs. If the climate is perfectly suited to humans it will also be perfect for those that like to feed off of humans. While grumbling about the cold seems to be a normal greeting in Saskatchewan, consider.. No poisonous insects or snakes. We have some annoying things, noseeums, mosquitoes, but the same cold we complain about really does stun them :D. I'll take a cooler place over a hot one any day, can dress for cold but the skin is the limit undressing for heat ( or the law, so many warm places have rules to cover up ).

Minimal effort places, Mexican highlands like around San Cristobal would be on my list, about 10c at night and 25 during the day. 12 hours days all year, food everywhere. Of course also has a list of "childhood diseases" the length of my arm ( Scarlet fever as an example ).  Little side story.. I was having a beer in San Cristobal with a parasitologist from Montreal working on her PHD. We were talking about tropical diseases and I mentioned having gone to my public health nurse in Sask. to see about vaccinations before travelling. I was told "Mexico? You don't need any, have a good time." the woman I was talking to screamed. 

South eastern China, great climate, Guangzhou on the Pearl river for instance "city of flowers". It's a very pretty place now, must have been amazing 2200 years ago before it got crowded. Another point, perfect places are likely to already be known about.

North Western BC coast could be nice, warm, wet, great scenery. Of course there are people ... ( I guess I stirred up some trouble once by suggesting that a clerk could do a calibration on some measuring instruments if I sent her the software and instructions. How could a WOMAN do something technical? Before that I had no opinion about the place, now it's in the "populated by jerks" category. )

Hmmm so a survivable wish list. Unpopulated mountain valley, with a hot spring and a waterfall, a few acres of good soil, lots of trees. Easy walking distance from a pub, and with gold nuggets laying around ( no point wishing small ). 

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Used to own some property down there and did my time with lawyers and with squatters..

Being an absentee landlord is a dreadful risk..

Having said that, if a person means to stay and cultivates trust relationships with locals to live in one's home if absent, under contract, it is possible to leave for awhile. Otherwise, you may be left homeless.

If the Country had proper real estate laws and protections, i would find it difficult to fault the place otherwise, as it is truly a delightful place to live, impossible to freeze or starve or bake..

Of course there are pluses and minuses to every locale, and my bias is towards the tropical..

That's rough :(. I think if I were to buy in a place like that I'd definitely go for land with no property on it. Squatters are a lot less likely that way. And I feel you on the bias toward the tropical. Can't help it, just feel like it's much more my kind of weather!

Hypothetically no people, no laws,...  If I can bring my dog I would life there 4 eva!!!  LOL

Other good thing about starting of in spring is it shows you the good, helping to get you ready for the bad.

Would love to see how far I could make it.  Never tried snow and knowing it will be on the way could be very exciting!  But will be a HUGE challenge!  Will need a wardrobe I have never owned and try skills I have only read about.  But yes would love to live there for a whole 12months.

Definitely could bring your dog in this scenario. I guess I should've specified you can lug over whatever you'd like that you can take with you in one trip or something like that.

Definitely agree that if you know the snow is coming and have time to prepare, it would probably be an exciting challenge to prepare for. Very cool to see how different people would prepare!

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So many trade offs. If the climate is perfectly suited to humans it will also be perfect for those that like to feed off of humans. While grumbling about the cold seems to be a normal greeting in Saskatchewan, consider.. No poisonous insects or snakes. We have some annoying things, noseeums, mosquitoes, but the same cold we complain about really does stun them :D. I'll take a cooler place over a hot one any day, can dress for cold but the skin is the limit undressing for heat ( or the law, so many warm places have rules to cover up ).

Minimal effort places, Mexican highlands like around San Cristobal would be on my list, about 10c at night and 25 during the day. 12 hours days all year, food everywhere. Of course also has a list of "childhood diseases" the length of my arm ( Scarlet fever as an example ).  Little side story.. I was having a beer in San Cristobal with a parasitologist from Montreal working on her PHD. We were talking about tropical diseases and I mentioned having gone to my public health nurse in Sask. to see about vaccinations before travelling. I was told "Mexico? You don't need any, have a good time." the woman I was talking to screamed. 

South eastern China, great climate, Guangzhou on the Pearl river for instance "city of flowers". It's a very pretty place now, must have been amazing 2200 years ago before it got crowded. Another point, perfect places are likely to already be known about.

North Western BC coast could be nice, warm, wet, great scenery. Of course there are people ... ( I guess I stirred up some trouble once by suggesting that a clerk could do a calibration on some measuring instruments if I sent her the software and instructions. How could a WOMAN do something technical? Before that I had no opinion about the place, now it's in the "populated by jerks" category. )

Hmmm so a survivable wish list. Unpopulated mountain valley, with a hot spring and a waterfall, a few acres of good soil, lots of trees. Easy walking distance from a pub, and with gold nuggets laying around ( no point wishing small ). 

Those sound like amazing places to survive. A hot spring & waterfall would definitely be a dream come true for a survivalist, I'd say.

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Being an absentee landlord is a dreadful risk..

Having said that, if a person means to stay and cultivates trust relationships with locals to live in one's home if absent, under contract, it is possible to leave for awhile. Otherwise, you may be left homeless.

If the Country had proper real estate laws and protections, i would find it difficult to fault the place otherwise, as it is truly a delightful place to live, impossible to freeze or starve or bake..

.

 

 

This is a very important point that I fear many people don't consider- I also have (too much) experience with the legal system with regards to "tenants". 

 

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I hate to sound like a 'fan' but I like Virginia. (or West Virginia/Kentucky/North Carolina/Tennessee). Winters don't suck TOO bad unless you're WAY up high in the mountains, Summers Don't suck too bad (and few hurricane problems in Fall) unless you're on the coast. MAYBE 1 tornado in 5-7 years, and they mostly hit the People's Republic of Maryland. We had an earthquake 3-4 years ago ,don't expect another for another 200 years. If SHTF, MIGHT have issues w/DC  "Horde". Not that worried about it.

Political "climate" tends toward "survivor-friendly", and in general, there is a culture of "mind your own business". so you won'y usually get bothered.

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There is an argument to be made for the fact that we are already banished to the wilderness just by showing up on this planet. I mean, if we think it is just 'happenstance' that we showed up here, then it is valid that it is humane to have a life long tax on our heads, just for taking up space, as the decision was not ours in the first place.

Space is expensive here. My taxes are over 220/month and if not that and a mortgage, there is rent.

In this part of the world, without a shelter taking up space without me in it, the survivability is actually barely humane. We may wax romantic about the Boreal wilderness, and to being the kind of "Special Forces" person who can parachute anywhere and make a go of it, but in speaking with the Elders who remember doing this, and the stories of their ancestors before them, the suffering was terrible. The ones who do it now are the 'only ones that can'.

The appeal of the wilderness is that it is tax-free. and human-free, because no matter what we think about calamity, our worst fears are that our self exile will be initiated by a human designed event..

That may engender a certain existential fear and lack of trust attributed to civilization and a survival risk to be around. So we entertain a little stealthy shelter from the storm, fire making and implements, and maybe a little day to day craftiness to eke out an existence to prove our persistence.

Anyways, where shelter from the austere environment is less an issue, space is even more valuable, as in more temperate zones the population pressures are inevitably higher, with less welfare demanded from the State, and more of this burden transferred to the tribe or family.

As a result, I thought this was the Wild West all my Life, until i lived in Central America..

Seems down there all You need is blood, in order to qualify for a 'feud'.

Always a trade-off..

 

 

 

Edited by Dan Seven
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I have been climatizing my body for the Michigan winter by sleeping in the unheated garage and using less blankets each week 

Current temp 45° F 

Climate is about getting used to it and being prepared love all 4 seasons and would not change.

 

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Tfire:  More power to you..

I have tried lot's of this in the past couple years, and and cheated with an electric blanket for some time..

I never did get sick, however, the sauna concept became more intriguing in my own mind..

As you know, suffering for it's own sake is pointless, and conditioning is crucial.

I remember talking to to an old Sgt. Major before he passed in '99, and he recounted 

prepping recruits for combat training in England, having a hand on the valve in the shower.

He would crank it one way till they turned blue, then back the other way when they went red.

Generally climate changes by degrees..

cheers

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There is an argument to be made for the fact that we are already banished to the wilderness just by showing up on this planet. I mean, if we think it is just 'happenstance' that we showed up here, then it is valid that it is humane to have a life long tax on our heads, just for taking up space, as the decision was not ours in the first place.

Space is expensive here. My taxes are over 220/month and if not that and a mortgage, there is rent.

In this part of the world, without a shelter taking up space without me in it, the survivability is actually barely humane. We may wax romantic about the Boreal wilderness, and to being the kind of "Special Forces" person who can parachute anywhere and make a go of it, but in speaking with the Elders who remember doing this, and the stories of their ancestors before them, the suffering was terrible. The ones who do it now are the 'only ones that can'.

The appeal of the wilderness is that it is tax-free. and human-free, because no matter what we think about calamity, our worst fears are that our self exile will be initiated by a human designed event..

That may engender a certain existential fear and lack of trust attributed to civilization and a survival risk to be around. So we entertain a little stealthy shelter from the storm, fire making and implements, and maybe a little day to day craftiness to eke out an existence to prove our persistence.

Anyways, where shelter from the austere environment is less an issue, space is even more valuable, as in more temperate zones the population pressures are inevitably higher, with less welfare demanded from the State, and more of this burden transferred to the tribe or family.

As a result, I thought this was the Wild West all my Life, until i lived in Central America..

Seems down there all You need is blood, in order to qualify for a 'feud'.

Always a trade-off..

 

Very cool way to look at things, Dan! And spot on, I think!

I have been climatizing my body for the Michigan winter by sleeping in the unheated garage and using less blankets each week 

Current temp 45° F 

Climate is about getting used to it and being prepared love all 4 seasons and would not change.

This sounds horrifying to me. I think I'll move someplace warm and then climatize my body ;) Haha.

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Hi, I live in top of New Zealand  and try to spend winters in tropics.

The subtropical climate  (NZ) is probably the best "year round" climate to thrive in.

15 hours of daylight here. 16+ in South island. (Summer time)

Not too many bugs, no snow. But we have the occasional cyclone and lots of volcanic activity.

Weather will always be the deciding factor in my view. I admire the Inuit for living where they do. I just don't have the knowledge or fortitude to "hack it" in that environment no matter how beautiful it may be.

Basically, in the Subtropics/tropics, you can throw a handful of no GMO seeds on ground and they will sprout and grow ALL year round, to a point.

The problem living in a small country like this, is the weather will change in 15 mins from a nice day to crap and back. That's why it is so green.

Real problem for tourists who get caught out all the time. #1 rescue problem here.

We locals carry cold and wet weather gear even on a nice day. Well, the smart ones do..

Pappyhiker seems to have a handle on it..

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Hmm.

 

It will be somewhere that i am familiar with, so east/central Texas.

 

Around 70°F, fall, when small game is the most plentiful

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On 1/24/2016 at 9:09 PM, zackmars said:

Hmm.

 

It will be somewhere that i am familiar with, so east/central Texas.

 

Around 70°F, fall, when small game is the most plentiful

I agree that it is less about a particular climate and more about what you're familiar with. That is where your skillset lies. You know your plants and game and weather patterns. 

For me where I'm at, winters would be tough, but on the bright side the game trails would look like highways.

So maybe we are personalizing the question to suit our skillsets too much. Maybe what is asked is about climate in general and not about our knowledge of our areas or our person preferences based on that knowledge. 

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At this point I would choose a moderate climate conducive to growing crops most of the year. I'm in Southern Ontario (Canada) now and winter can be 4 to 6 cold months (all though this year is very mild). I've only dabbled in using indoor grow lights and that was for starting veggies to transplant outdoors. So my 'current' comfort level would be with a place that would be relatively easier to feed the family. 

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Hi Rspreps !

i have waxed on the fact that there may be easier places to live. Recently a new 'poll' was in my vision that Canada was the 2nd best country to live in besides Germany.

I do not know what to think of that, though universally in my travels i have noted that folks all want basically the same things.

Ease...temperateness in the face of extremes that have no absolute values. Must be relative..

Where i live is hard enough. The other day i commented in a downtown bar that i was a mile from where i was born. I said, "looks like a crawled a mile to be where i am all these years"

The answer from a new friend was..."crawling  the first mile is the hardest"

I am now  a mile away from that..and it does not feel a whole lot different. 

Ironically, 5000 miles away it did not feel that different either..

The earth will welcome me where i am or kick me out. For now, here it is not.

I guess i have wandered and explored, and found that where i came from was ok.

The old Chinese saying :

"If You stay in one place long enough, the World will come to You"

salut

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Fair enough, and there's many places in the world that match my temperate requirements but I still wouldn't take them over where I am now. 

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