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Saws ?

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A thread inspired by comments on the Rajah 2  thread.

I have a number of folding saws that I have experimented-with.  The megamart cheapies and the big-box hardware/DIY store pruning saws are not-at-all bad for trimming branches/harvesting small firewood.  I'm rather surprised that they have not broken/messed up over the years.

I keep an aluminum-frame bowsaw and a hacksaw in my truck for bigger jobs and metal (or bamboo). I don't own a 2-person felling saw, but I probably should.

When it comes to precise cutting (IMHO) the normal English-pattern push-stroke handsaw is just an atrocity. You can now pick up Japanese-pattern pull-stroke carpenter's saws (coarse to super-fine) for under $30US almost anywhere. Try one, you'll never look back.

So, what are your saw-choices?

 

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Had a friend point out that my hacksaw was backward ( for him ), I set them as a pull stroke too. 9_9 Steel frame bow saw for bucking firewood ( often blamed on Sweden for some reason ). Other then that, well I'm a techie so tend to have power tools ( band saw for steel, brass, iron. Zippy cut for working with sheet metal. Table saw, mitre saw, Skil saw, Makita Sawsall, Sahks Dohlmar chainsaw, Pioneer chainsaw....  )

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The saw I use when planning to clear some fallen trees (small)  is a folding Sven saw. Like a bow saw but a triangle. Comes with a hack saw, bone blade and wood blade. Easy and safe to carry as blades are in frame until needed. Cuts like a laser when assembled.

Not expensive either.

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Interestingly I am reviewing the Bahco Laplander today! I absolutely love these saws, in my opinion they have supplanted my need for large choppers and axes in 90% of situations in the outdoors.

test-bacho-laplander-folding-saw-review-testing-bacho-laplander-saw-review-foldiproduct-review-survival-gear-bacho-lapla

 

Some previews ;) I tested it last year and have been using it since then. My only worry is that it is in essence a disposable tool- I don't see how you could ever sharpen those teeth.

What would be cool is a folding saw with Veff style serrations (see below).

 

innovation_VeffSerrations_full.jpg.9da09

 

I imagine they would perform quite nicely and if the stock is thin enough it would be an acceptable saw with the advantage of being easily sharpened. Thoughts?

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6 hours ago, Thomas said:

Interestingly I am reviewing the Bahco Laplander today! I absolutely love these saws, in my opinion they have supplanted my need for large choppers and axes in 90% of situations in the outdoors.

Some previews ;) I tested it last year and have been using it since then. My only worry is that it is in essence a disposable tool- I don't see how you could ever sharpen those teeth.

What would be cool is a folding saw with Veff style serrations

I imagine they would perform quite nicely and if the stock is thin enough it would be an acceptable saw with the advantage of being easily sharpened. Thoughts?

I'm pretty sure you could resharpen those with a jig and a dremel, much like resharpening a band saw blade. Might not even be too bad freehand as long as the blade is well clamped. Would be nice to practice on something else first and getting an even set on the teeth ( alternating side to side, punch and hammer work ) would take some practice too. Shouldn't be that frequent as long as you aren't running into abrasive or hard material, like rocks or nails.

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I've never had to sharpen my Gerber saw. Still razor sharp. Recently ordered a replacement blade as a back up in case I bend it. ($10)

Gary, these blades have no set to them, just like a Japanese pull saw. Cut like a laser.

I also have Silky Saw, but I tend to use the Gerber as it is lighter weight.

Certainly would not like to come up against someone using one of these saws as a weapon.

Edited by kiwitransient
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1 hour ago, Gary_Gough said:

I'm pretty sure you could resharpen those with a jig and a dremel, much like resharpening a band saw blade. Might not even be too bad freehand as long as the blade is well clamped. Would be nice to practice on something else first and getting an even set on the teeth ( alternating side to side, punch and hammer work ) would take some practice too. Shouldn't be that frequent as long as you aren't running into abrasive or hard material, like rocks or nails.

The Bahco has dual sided (cross hatched) 7 teeth per inch serrations. Sharpening them would be...brutal.

One day when I am feeling particularly masochistic I will give it a shot & see what happens. If the teeth are blunt, I have nothing to lose!

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8 hours ago, kiwitransient said:

I've never had to sharpen my Gerber saw. Still razor sharp. Recently ordered a replacement blade as a back up in case I bend it. ($10)

Gary, these blades have no set to them, just like a Japanese pull saw. Cut like a laser.

I also have Silky Saw, but I tend to use the Gerber as it is lighter weight.

Certainly would not like to come up against someone using one of these saws as a weapon.

Hmmm, no set. I'm surprised they aren't prone to binding. Yeah sharpening something that would require that level of consistency would be best left to a machine. Tooth length and angles would all need to be tight tolerance.

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If  I get a chance, it would be interesting to do a Gerber (no set) / Bahco (set) comparison.

Seems to me that the Bahco would cut cleaner/faster as the set would of course, cut a wider channel and clear the wood quicker. Possibly better when doing the 1st under cut on limb to slow down the pinch factor. Only had the blade caught once, but it is a real bitch when it happens. At least I know the set won't be damaged !

For those who don't know what I'm talking about (including me half the time) when cutting larger horizontal branches, a under cut is made 1st under the branch on the trunk side of cut.   Then top cut made. The under cut results that when the branch/limb is top cut enough, it will simply shear off and not stay attached. Much safer.

The non set Gerber is very efficient though, and I won't be rushing off to upgrade..

Saying that, I did turn it upside down and take a sharp knife to those hard plastic edges inside were the blade folds into handle. A bit hard on fingers when doing lots of cuts.

Edited by kiwitransient
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On 2/19/2016 at 10:29 AM, kiwitransient said:

If  I get a chance, it would be interesting to do a Gerber (no set) / Bahco (set) comparison.

Seems to me that the Bahco would cut cleaner/faster as the set would of course, cut a wider channel and clear the wood quicker. Possibly better when doing the 1st under cut on limb to slow down the pinch factor. Only had the blade caught once, but it is a real bitch when it happens. At least I know the set won't be damaged !

For those who don't know what I'm talking about (including me half the time) when cutting larger horizontal branches, a under cut is made 1st under the branch on the trunk side of cut.   Then top cut made. The under cut results that when the branch/limb is top cut enough, it will simply shear off and not stay attached. Much safer.

The non set Gerber is very efficient though, and I won't be rushing off to upgrade..

Saying that, I did turn it upside down and take a sharp knife to those hard plastic edges inside were the blade folds into handle. A bit hard on fingers when doing lots of cuts.

Once I gain more experience with the different saw offerings, I think I will do a mega round up.

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Roundup is a dirty wood here. Lots of sheep dead down South from eating Kale that was Roundup proof. Happened a couple of years ago but Media has only found out recently. GMO is a damned Eco. disaster as far as I'm concerned. Approx. 50,000 people turned up 10 years back to declare N Z GMO free. Our P.M at time (Helen Clark) said, "I'm NOT going to be told how to run my Country" or words to that affect, and steamrollered the Bill to allow GM modified food in NZ. Now Ex. P.M. and  now Secretary on U.N. Council.

Now We have to suffer the consequences. And the Sheep doing what Sheep do, just said Baa, and rolled over. (like the rest of us..)

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Apologize for the thread resurrection, but it seemed to be the best place for this. For some reason I've wanted a Sven saw for years and this year I finally bought one. (15") I used it on a camping trip in New Hampshire and for this one trip it did exactly what I expected.  It packed light (I flew to NH).  It was easy to set up.  It cut wood.  It's best suited for 2" - 3" branches, but it did cut some 5" - 6" logs as well.  I cannot speak to the longevity of the blade, but this earned a place in my BOB based on this week's performance.  I might consider the 21" model if I was buying again, and I still want to test this against some folders, but I have to say that the 15" Sven Saw did not disappoint.

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I happen to have a 16pc set of reciprocating saw blades sitting in front of me and thought "Gosh, if I had a good handle for these I could cut through a lot of different stuff."  It would be fairly compact as well.  The handles I found online ranged from $15 - $50 for the Bosch.  The folders are 6" but I don't see why you couldn't slap in the biggest blade you have if needed.  There don't seem to be many of these handles on the market, and some resemble big utility knives, so I might actually prefer a substantial home-built one if I could get it, maybe with a guard to save fingers.

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Got a Bahco and a couple of very cheap folders of a similar style. The Bahco is definitely better made, blade locks both open and closed as opposed to just open in the cheap folders, handle feels much better. That said both cut wood just fine. Have one of the cheap folders in the bag in my van, and actually used it about two weeks after I got it to clear a tree off the driveway on my way to work. ( 1 km driveway, 80 year old trees and a storm, not uncommon ) Maybe 3 minutes to cut the 30 cm tree into moveable lengths, so it did the job. 

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