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History Channels new show "Alone"

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And no idea where the next season might be, but I'm guessing it's another place with bears or wolves or such.

I agree that they are probably liking the idea of a setting with some carnivorous or at least omnivorous predators in the area just for the hype factor in the commercials. I am guessing they will also stick with wetter areas over dry to lower the risk of death due to heat and/or dehydration. Having 5 contestants tap in the first week on this one is one thing, but at least only one of them was due to water issues. In a desert environment it could be much more much faster. A mixed forest on the other hand, may be a possibility, I am thinking something like the forests of Arizona and New Mexico. Admittedly though, I would love to see them in a place like the Pine Ridge in South Dakota or the short grass prairie of North Dakota and the Canadian prairie provinces. Everything would be fine until the first blizzard or tornado hit..........

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I am guessing they will also stick with wetter areas over dry to lower the risk of death due to heat and/or dehydration. Having 5 contestants tap in the first week on this one is one thing, but at least only one of them was due to water issues. In a desert environment it could be much more much faster.

This is very true. I'd have to agree with you. My guess is if they do a desert season one year, they'll probably have people on who are interested in desert survival in particular (or at least they should - it's totally different from survival in other areas).

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Sorry but was it on last night? Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

Yup I think so. Haven't caught up on it yet myself, though!

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Absolutely agree. And I hope (for the shows sake) that the same person inspected the gear of each contestant. I mean if I had brought a tin to "hold" my fishing gear and was told it was an extra piece of gear while Mitch (and maybe others) were allowed to bring one I would get pissed.

 

Anyone got ideas or guesses (or even preferences) for where they are located next season?

I agree 100%. Consistency in vetting of gear would be huge.

As far as next season, wouldn't be surprised to find them in the desert in mid-summer. Just to mix things up. 

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DAM Pvr. It didn't record it. Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

You can go to the History Channel's website and watch it there, as well as a bunch of other stuff, including some footage that didn't make it to the broadcast.

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DAM Pvr. It didn't record it. Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

Sucks when that happens, but yup Ron is right!

You can go to the History Channel's website and watch it there, as well as a bunch of other stuff, including some footage that didn't make it to the broadcast.

Link to yesterday's episode is here: http://www.history.ca/alone/video/winds+of+hell/video.html?v=485390915701&p=1&s=da#alone/video

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Just watched the last episode, Mitch is still very depressing & Alan is still my personal choice but what I found fascinating is that all of the tap outs (thus so far) were out of choice, driven by fear or depression and not necessity. Some of them psyched themselves out to the point of giving up the fight which is very interesting to watch play out on your screen. 

 

Lucas seems to have received a huge boost of confidence & Alan is getting a touch gloomy but overall I feel that those 2 and Sam will be the final 3. With either Sam or Alan the winner. 

Who do you think will win?

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i generally like this show and was happy to see the guy from Pittsburgh get reasonably far.  that said, i am not at all shocked that the remaining 4 are the ones left standing.  you could tell pretty early with them that they were a bit more comfortable with their situation.  the one that did surprise me a little bit is sam.  he has put up a pretty good performance thus far when i really didnt expect too much from him.  If i had to put money on one of the remaining people though, i think id bet on Mitch.  IMO he has shown some of the best core skills displayed by any of the competitors.  plus he has already had a run in with the wildlife and continued on undeterred.  Lucas is a bit of a wildcard.  i feel like he has really big dreams and ideas.  they could have a big payoff, but they also come with significant risk.  we'll have to see how it plays out

 

id say my biggest disappointment so far though has been that the vast majority or people have called it quits based solely on the animals.  i understand that dealing with wildlife is for sure a part of survival, but personally, id have rather seen people tap out because they didnt have the necessary skills, rather than simply not wanting to get mauled or eaten.

 

i get that the no guns issue is because of the location.  id just have rather seen a few more people get to show off their survival skills, and tap out when things became too much in that regard, rather than quitting due to their fully justified fear of the wildlife.  i do appreciate that it is simple.  it is survival in a relatively pure sense.  not 'hey watch me jump into this crevasse...' type of TV survival

 

 

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i get that the no guns issue is because of the location.  id just have rather seen a few more people get to show off their survival skills, and tap out when things became too much in that regard, rather than quitting due to their fully justified fear of the wildlife.

I really have to agree with you there. It kinda makes me hope they'll pick a location with no big animals next time... Doubt that will be the case, however...:/

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I'd be building some defense structures, punji sticks pits or something ( those big cats are scary). I've had the privilege of being up close and personal with mountain lions and bob cats, they might have been pretty tame but they scarred the bajebus out of me.

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 Here in Missouri, our normally fabulous State Conservation Department seems to have their collective heads in the sand regarding mountain lions/cougars/panthers, whatever term you prefer. They swear up, down and sideways that there is NO resident population of the big cats in this state. And yet a year doesn't go by that several aren't road-killed, others are captured on game-trail camera footage, and even, occasionally, treed by hunters. They claim that all of these are either escaped pets or "just travelin' through, nothing to see here, move right along". Uh huh. The average city slicker might buy the state's party line, but almost every outdoorsman I know of takes it serious, and is prepared in one way or another for the possible chance encounter, especially when alone at night.

I have had two occasions myself. Once, about 20 years ago, my brother and I took my little niece, about 6 at the time, on her first camping trip, to a State Forest about 80 miles SW of St. Louis. Place I have camped many times before and since. We were exploring a sand bar on the far side of the creek, when we spotted the tracks of what looked to be a large buck. And right next to it was a cat print. That cat print was bigger around than the paw print of my 120-lb Golden Retriever, and pretty fresh. The impressions were still perfectly sharp, and grains of sand were falling from the edges of the main "palm". And, after sniffing at them, my dog, normally very laid back, had his hackles up and growling fit to beat the band. My brother and I looked at each other, I grabbed our niece, and we headed back to "our" side of the creek and our campsite. We never actually saw the cat itself, but we did hear it scream once, late that night. That made MY hackles stand up, I can tell ya!

The other occasion was about 4 years ago, on a railroad right-of-way about 35 miles west of St. Louis. I was there about 2 AM, taking a fresh crew out to a tied-down coal train. I crested a hill on the gravel road leading to the tracks, when my headlights fell full on a cougar standing right in the middle of the path to the train. It looked straight at us for a few seconds, then trotted across the tracks and into the woods. Needless to say, the crew was quite cautious as they walked to their locomotive, with one guy always walking backward keeping a lookout. A week or so later, a property owner a few miles east of there, caught a cougar, possibly the same one, on a game camera on his property, also near the same set of railroad tracks.

We have black bears in Missouri too, which the Conservation Department does acknowledge, but other than an occasional issue with trash cans being raided, I haven't heard of any serious problems with them. But those cats, as the man says, "scare the bajebus out of me!"

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I have had two occasions myself.

Okay those were scary stories. I can't believe your State Conservation Department is completely denying the fact that they're in your state. Do you think they just want to keep people from freaking out about these big cats? Or do you think they actually don't believe they live there?

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A few years ago I was approaching a river glade about 3 miles (5 kms or so ) from where I live.

A large Cougar crossed the trail about 30ft (10m or so) in front of Me.

a.  No doubt in my mind it was some sort of Lion.

b.  No doubt in my mind I was some form of Monkey.

The thought crossed my mind as to what my chances were as my right hand went into my pocket an landed on a SWAK.

In other words pretty much none..

We may be the apex predator on this planet, but we did not win that 'one on one' with our bare hands.

It is an unfair enough fight that around here I consider it the chance of a lifetime to witness this occurrence in the wild.

I think that is why the conservation folks are so concerned, in so many areas, as many of them, after many years have not had this privilege..

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Okay those were scary stories. I can't believe your State Conservation Department is completely denying the fact that they're in your state. Do you think they just want to keep people from freaking out about these big cats? Or do you think they actually don't believe they live there?

I'm not sure. I find it hard to believe that they don't believe the cats are now living in this state again, with such overwhelming evidence. They are a top-notch agency with some of the best and brightest in the fields of wildlife biology and conservation management. Yet I also find it hard to believe that the agency, well-known for being very informative about problem issues, is deliberately fibbing, for any reason. Especially when to do so could give a "false sense of security" to the gullible and get someone hurt, or worse.

A few years ago I was approaching a river glade about 3 miles (5 kms or so ) from where I live.

A large Cougar crossed the trail about 30ft (10m or so) in front of Me.

a.  No doubt in my mind it was some sort of Lion.

b.  No doubt in my mind I was some form of Monkey.

The thought crossed my mind as to what my chances were as my right hand went into my pocket an landed on a SWAK.

In other words pretty much none..

We may be the apex predator on this planet, but we did not win that 'one on one' with our bare hands.

It is an unfair enough fight that around here I consider it the chance of a lifetime to witness this occurrence in the wild.

I think that is why the conservation folks are so concerned, in so many areas, as many of them, after many years have not had this privilege..

I agree! 

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We may be the apex predator on this planet, but we did not win that 'one on one' with our bare hands.

So true. We got the brains but certainly not the brawn.

I'm not sure. I find it hard to believe that they don't believe the cats are now living in this state again, with such overwhelming evidence. They are a top-notch agency with some of the best and brightest in the fields of wildlife biology and conservation management. Yet I also find it hard to believe that the agency, well-known for being very informative about problem issues, is deliberately fibbing, for any reason. Especially when to do so could give a "false sense of security" to the gullible and get someone hurt, or worse.

Agree with all of that. Maybe they're just denying it because they are a little unsure about whether the big animals stay or go? - and so don't want to jump to conclusions or create panic by telling everyone that they are for sure in the state when they're not 100% sure. That's the best explanation I can come up with...

That being said, if that were the case, you'd think they would instead want to say that there may be large cats in the area instead of just outright denying it.

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 Here in Missouri, our normally fabulous State Conservation Department seems to have their collective heads in the sand regarding mountain lions/cougars/panthers, whatever term you prefer. They swear up, down and sideways that there is NO resident population of the big cats in this state. And yet a year doesn't go by that several aren't road-killed, others are captured on game-trail camera footage, and even, occasionally, treed by hunters. They claim that all of these are either escaped pets or "just travelin' through, nothing to see here, move right along". Uh huh. The average city slicker might buy the state's party line, but almost every outdoorsman I know of takes it serious, and is prepared in one way or another for the possible chance encounter, especially when alone at night.

I have had two occasions myself. Once, about 20 years ago, my brother and I took my little niece, about 6 at the time, on her first camping trip, to a State Forest about 80 miles SW of St. Louis. Place I have camped many times before and since. We were exploring a sand bar on the far side of the creek, when we spotted the tracks of what looked to be a large buck. And right next to it was a cat print. That cat print was bigger around than the paw print of my 120-lb Golden Retriever, and pretty fresh. The impressions were still perfectly sharp, and grains of sand were falling from the edges of the main "palm". And, after sniffing at them, my dog, normally very laid back, had his hackles up and growling fit to beat the band. My brother and I looked at each other, I grabbed our niece, and we headed back to "our" side of the creek and our campsite. We never actually saw the cat itself, but we did hear it scream once, late that night. That made MY hackles stand up, I can tell ya!

The other occasion was about 4 years ago, on a railroad right-of-way about 35 miles west of St. Louis. I was there about 2 AM, taking a fresh crew out to a tied-down coal train. I crested a hill on the gravel road leading to the tracks, when my headlights fell full on a cougar standing right in the middle of the path to the train. It looked straight at us for a few seconds, then trotted across the tracks and into the woods. Needless to say, the crew was quite cautious as they walked to their locomotive, with one guy always walking backward keeping a lookout. A week or so later, a property owner a few miles east of there, caught a cougar, possibly the same one, on a game camera on his property, also near the same set of railroad tracks.

We have black bears in Missouri too, which the Conservation Department does acknowledge, but other than an occasional issue with trash cans being raided, I haven't heard of any serious problems with them. But those cats, as the man says, "scare the bajebus out of me!"

Thats frankly horrifying. I can't believe the Department denies this!

 

A few years ago I was approaching a river glade about 3 miles (5 kms or so ) from where I live.

A large Cougar crossed the trail about 30ft (10m or so) in front of Me.

a.  No doubt in my mind it was some sort of Lion.

b.  No doubt in my mind I was some form of Monkey.

The thought crossed my mind as to what my chances were as my right hand went into my pocket an landed on a SWAK.

In other words pretty much none..

We may be the apex predator on this planet, but we did not win that 'one on one' with our bare hands.

It is an unfair enough fight that around here I consider it the chance of a lifetime to witness this occurrence in the wild.

I think that is why the conservation folks are so concerned, in so many areas, as many of them, after many years have not had this privilege..

I have no idea what I would do in such a situation. I have never been face to face with any dangerous animals outside of my control (hunting).

How would you defend yourself against a Cougar?

 

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Well, I have read up on what a person is supposed to do, based on a few survivor reports..

The numbers say about 4000 in Canada and 3500 in BC, and as we learned from 'Alone' many of those Cats

are on the Island. Here in Saskatchewan the estimate is about 300, where I am is North in their range.

There was a sighting near Okanagon Valley some years ago about the "Black Panther" variant.

Conservation people will not even speak to the public as to where exactly that is, so incredibly rare.

My observation is that they almost never include us in their diet. They eat almost Exclusively other game.

When it happens they do, it is sensationalized beyond rationality.

Our fears for 'control' over our environment are from a population of beings that are arguably numerically out of control.

I am not judging here, but 4000 Cougars in this country compared to 36 million of us, is a lopsided reason, out of existential fear, to start a "program" to thin their numbers, when a Cougar takes a human life.

We certainly do not apply that logic to each other, the exception being war-time, and even then it is considered a war crime.

Nevertheless, these Cats attack from behind and bury the claws in the throat, while it's jaws seek to crush the base of the skull to separate the notochord and crush cervical vertebrae.

All while a 120 to 160lb cat(or heavier) is throwing it's full  weight at a good run to take you down.

So hopefully, we have noticed it's rear-action tactical assault. For me, walking into the animal and surprising it in front of me, allowed me to back out, as it stood at the edge of the trail, perhaps wondering how I managed to get so close, or what the encounter meant.

As soon as I got 50 yards or so decided to sprint back a half mile to my truck.

Magnificent animal. I would do it over again just to see it interacting with the world the way it was supposed to.

One question is to ask if in large predator territory is if what we do or have to be safe will make us fearless.

If we express we are packing or have something up our sleeve, it is just a matter of time that we learn that  human nature is just part of Nature-nature. Still natural enough to be aware that our 'fearlessness' is little more than treachery.

Getting along with nature requires a different relationship model imho.

Please everyone take this with a grain of salt. I have run for my life many a time..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Dan Seven
missed a word
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Well, I have read up on what a person is supposed to do, based on a few survivor reports..

The numbers say about 4000 in Canada and 3500 in BC, and as we learned from 'Alone' many of those Cats

are on the Island. Here in Saskatchewan the estimate is about 300, where I am is North in their range.

There was a sighting near Okanagon Valley some years ago about the "Black Panther" variant.

Conservation people will not even speak to the public as to where exactly that is, so incredibly rare.

My observation is that they almost never include us in their diet. They eat almost Exclusively other game.

When it happens they do, it is sensationalized beyond rationality.

Our fears for 'control' over our environment are from a population of beings that are arguably numerically out of control.

I am not judging here, but 4000 Cougars in this country compared to 36 million of us, is a lopsided reason, out of existential fear, to start a "program" to thin their numbers, when a Cougar takes a human life.

We certainly do not apply that logic to each other, the exception being war-time, and even then it is considered a war crime.

Nevertheless, these Cats attack from behind and bury the claws in the throat, while it's jaws seek to crush the base of the skull to separate the notochord and crush cervical vertebrae.

All while a 120 to 160lb cat(or heavier) is throwing it's full  weight at a good run to take you down.

So hopefully, we have noticed it's rear-action tactical assault. For me, walking into the animal and surprising it in front of me, allowed me to back out, as it stood at the edge of the trail, perhaps wondering how I managed to get so close, or what the encounter meant.

As soon as I got 50 yards or so decided to sprint back a half mile to my truck.

Magnificent animal. I would do it over again just to see it interacting with the world the way it was supposed to.

One question is to ask if in large predator territory is if what we do or have to be safe will make us fearless.

If we express we are packing or have something up our sleeve, it is just a matter of time that we learn that  human nature is just part of Nature-nature. Still natural enough to be aware that our 'fearlessness' is little more than treachery.

Getting along with nature requires a different relationship model imho.

Please everyone take this with a grain of salt. I have run for my life many a time..

I am inclined to agree based on your experiences & it certainly makes a lot of sense. Unfortunately I have so little experience dealing with predators that deep down I don't know how I would react.  

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Tomas it is difficult to interact with a Cougar and 'grok' out it's nature in the wild, so few..

Bears are easier, this time of year I have headed out to Nisbet forest in SK and walked the trails around berry

patches where they are pigging out. They are one evolutionary notch above pigs, and almost as unpredictable.

The main thing is that they have a lovely inner life and with a respectful attitude will allow approach to feel them out.

They want no surprises, want to know you are there, and some of them have had bad experiences because of us,

and will react. That is normal. It results in bad experiences for people if they are not conscious of this.

Bears are not people, but that does not mean that trying to take em out is not personal.

They get this, and the ones that have been spared will often play a bit and let us know just how far "in" we can get.

Others that have been targeted will assume we are criminally insane, and any 'in' or approach is just to destroy them.

Hell, we do that to each other..

I have found that playing it cool is the first step, and as you are a cool guy will have no problem..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I'm not sure. I find it hard to believe that they don't believe the cats are now living in this state again, with such overwhelming evidence. They are a top-notch agency with some of the best and brightest in the fields of wildlife biology and conservation management. Yet I also find it hard to believe that the agency, well-known for being very informative about problem issues, is deliberately fibbing, for any reason. Especially when to do so could give a "false sense of security" to the gullible and get someone hurt, or worse.

 

I agree! 

Very Good..

Plausible deniable to delay the reaction of report of 'dangerous animal' that is better off as a possible

legend, than the Florida Panther that is bordering on becoming a myth.  Time is of the essence.

Perhaps the Missouri cat is too close to joining this.

To whom do we give the benefit of the doubt.. Up to us..

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If I may be so bold..

Ron, a sense of proportion about life is a necessity..

There is the proportion that believes that the host...say the planet , is willing to host the consciousness of all that is

the divine and human..no matter what the load..And all other life is an afterthought..

It might suggest that no matter, what other life is anclliary, or tangential to us..we are  the most important..fair..

In generations, with almost no life left, (read cougars) it may be more acceptable that the chance to see that other than insects,

which are a threat to survival..may be the most important concern to us..the rest being gone. Getting there...

We must give those who have 'voice' to life ' their say before it is too late.. lest roaches become our legacy..

There is like 7.2 billon of Us..is that right?  not sure...but close...true?

 

 

 

 

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Tomas it is difficult to interact with a Cougar and 'grok' out it's nature in the wild, so few..

Bears are easier, this time of year I have headed out to Nisbet forest in SK and walked the trails around berry

patches where they are pigging out. They are one evolutionary notch above pigs, and almost as unpredictable.

The main thing is that they have a lovely inner life and with a respectful attitude will allow approach to feel them out.

They want no surprises, want to know you are there, and some of them have had bad experiences because of us,

and will react. That is normal. It results in bad experiences for people if they are not conscious of this.

Bears are not people, but that does not mean that trying to take em out is not personal.

They get this, and the ones that have been spared will often play a bit and let us know just how far "in" we can get.

Others that have been targeted will assume we are criminally insane, and any 'in' or approach is just to destroy them.

Hell, we do that to each other..

I have found that playing it cool is the first step, and as you are a cool guy will have no problem..

Having absolutely zero experience with cougars or bears I would have to say that any encounter I might have with either of them in the wilderness would definitely frighten me - even if the animal wasn't particularly close or everything turned out just fine.

When it comes to cats - if these large cats are anything like the cute little kinds we keep at home - they're a bit unpredictable for my liking. I mean yes, we're definitely not their favourite dish - but food is not the only reason a cat will attack. Sometimes they just get bored and see a plaything/source of amusement. Cats have no problems killing mice to have an entertaining 15 minutes, and at that point it's bye bye mouse when kitty wasn't even hungry. I definitely don't consider cats ruthless, it's just their nature. And there's no way they'd be good hunters if they didn't have a prey drive like that.

Now I'm not saying this is what cougars are like - how would I know? And I'm sure it's not too bad considering we probably don't really look like prey to them (maybe unless they're hungry), and I feel confident they wouldn't actively seek humans to kill, whether for food or sport. But not knowing anything much about them or having any experience with them - they'd definitely still frighten me if I encountered one in the wild.

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If I may be so bold..

Ron, a sense of proportion about life is a necessity..

There is the proportion that believes that the host...say the planet , is willing to host the consciousness of all that is

the divine and human..no matter what the load..And all other life is an afterthought..

It might suggest that no matter, what other life is anclliary, or tangential to us..we are  the most important..fair..

In generations, with almost no life left, (read cougars) it may be more acceptable that the chance to see that other than insects,

which are a threat to survival..may be the most important concern to us..the rest being gone. Getting there...

We must give those who have 'voice' to life ' their say before it is too late.. lest roaches become our legacy..

There is like 7.2 billon of Us..is that right?  not sure...but close...true?

 

 

 

 

Ummm, ok. I think.

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