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History Channels new show "Alone"

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they need to take : The new Condor shovel, with the saw edge,  a modified Crunch multitool, (with a Silky saw blade to be held in the visegrip) the 12x12 tarp, the sleeping bag, the 5 qt skillet (Amazon) the 8 treblehooks and fishlne, one of Chief Aj's slingbows and the 6 arrows, 4 of which should have  4-tined fishing  heads, which swiftly convert into  32 fishhooks, a 2 person hammock made out of 750 (9- strand) paracord, which can be woven into 2000 sq ft of 3" mesh netting, a big roll of heavy duty duct tape, and one  5-lb ration of a mix of gorp and pemmican.

Fish and game lack carbs. By far the most feasible carb-source on Vancouver Island is to juice the kelp, with a big wooden mortar and pestle. They need to convert their gaiters into dry bags, with a fishhook made by straightening out a fishhook and the tape. One of them should be full of the salt that you recover from seawater, by boiling it constantly, for about 3 weeks. The other gaiter-drybag should be full of forced-dry (ie, with hot rocks)  tinder, ashes, and charred punkwood.

Use the treblehooks on small log rafts, baited with roasted cambium, for gulls and ducks, with a  3 lb drowning rock tied about a foot from each hook. Make a tree platform blind, use the fishheads and guts to bait in a bear and arrow it. There's the fat that you need. Fish (unless they salmon) offer no fat.

Cut a 3 ft slice off of the 12x12, and another one off of the remaining 9x12. You need to make a poncho and hood, cause you'll be using the legs of the rainsuit to filter and store water and the sleeves of the jacket to haul water. :-) Make a dry bag ou out of the tarp and tape, for protecting the camera gear. Tape the seams of the hard Pelican camera cases and use them for floatation devices, making your little outrigger log raft a viable way to get up and down the coast, and to install and service your crab traps and nets. Sapling frames and netting (several wraps) make traps for birds, crabs, fish, mammals. 

You may not be able to get thru the winter with the above gear and tactics, but you go without losing any weight for 3 months.  Things that would make it possible to get thru the winter would be catching a lot of fish, being on a body of water that doesn't freeze up, arrowing at least  2 bears, , eating a lot of cambium, finding a wild beehive, arrowing a seal or 2, catching a ton of fowl, quite a few coons, possums or porcupines,  (they  have fat) extracting tree sap in March.

Forget elaborate shelters, until you've made it 2 months without losing any weight and have  100 lbs of food preserved. If you dont take care of the food first, you'll starve out before you need that shelter!  A 9x9, set up diagonally over a ridgepole, 3.5 ft high at the head end, tapering to 2.5 ft high at the foot end, slit the diamonds at each end, letting them drape down and form the doors of your little sleeping shelter. Use the 10x10 "camera tarp " to form the roof of your 7 ft high "work awning" in front of the sleeping shelter. Use brush, debris and dirt to make the sides and end of this shelter.  Have a pair of Dakota pits, one on each side of the awning, with long, tapering access holes, so you can feed  long timbers into the flames  without having to cut them to length. Keep the shelter portable, and move it to where the squawood is. Dont waste time and calories carrying wood to your shelter.  prop up some big, flat rocks over the vertical holes to the firepits, to reflect heat towards your work area. At night, slip them under your raised bed.

When you are using fishguts as fishbait, use little chunks of t shirt to make bait bags, so the minnows can't nibble off all of your bait. If you need smaller mesh netting, fold over the 3" mesh and tie every other mesh, you'll have 1.5" mesh. Do it again and you'll have  3/4" mesh. While it's nice to have a drawstring and a round cast net, you CAN make a square net work in shallow water, after tying small stones around its edges Cast it over the school of small fish, pinning them to the bottom of the body of water.. Use a small  sharpened stick to brain each one, after you find it by feel (the fish will stir up mud in their struggles)  after you've killed them all, remove the net, and they will all float, letting you put them into a container.  Once you've woven the net with too small mesh, you see, you have no option to make it larger. So you start with big mesh netting.

Edited by ratter
incomplete

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On 7/24/2015 at 10:47 AM, Ron Johnson said:

So, last nigt's episode. Best yet? Maybe so. Nobody tapped out at least. Four remaining guys all seem to have a pretty good grip on their abilities, and are more or less thriving physically, bouts of bowel trouble notwithstanding.

As we've discussed several times, it's going to come down to the psychology, the loneliness, the boredom. Mitch is showing the most signs of cracking, followed by Sam, Alan the most mental resourcefulness. Lucas, who knows? He's been a little weird from the beginning.

My bet, at this point, is a toss-up between Alan and Lucas for the win, with Alan maybe having a slight edge.

they were all losing at least half a lb per day, so they certainly were NOT thriving physically. 

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I have never seen any reason to vote for any given one, other than Dave McIntire, and then only  after he wove his net and found the natural crab trap. I gave props to alan for not wasting a pick on an axe.   I did think that the Whipples had the deck stacked in their favor, due to the fact that they'd not have to split the prize money.   But they made the usual mistake of messing with a shelter instead of providing massive amounts of food income. You should be dealing with the cold by taking adequate clothing and sleeping bag, so fire and firewood should be only a minor issue.

Make a poncho out of a hunk of tarp and some tape, since you'll get wet inside of the rainsuit anyway.   The rainsuit is much better used as water filter and storage (the legs) and water carrier (jacket/sleeves)

Edited by ratter
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You can start your first fire with the batteries that they give you, the tape and either the tines from the fishing arrowheads, or some of the fishhooks (arranged in chain fashion) Once you make a dry bag out of one of the gaitors ( sewing with a straightened-out fishhook and taping the seams) you can forcedry (with hot rocks) some tinder, and keep dry some ashes and charred punkwood.  Once you have those, any piece of quartz or chert and any carbon steel tool will suffice for a fire. If you bury some coals, touching some dry wood that's also buried in ashes, the fire will be "re-ignitable' for hours.   Half a day will suffice to make a big pump drill, which will start friction fire easily, as long as the inserts for the spindle head and the hearth board are kept dry in your dry bag.

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if you dont prep properly, even the ferrorod wont succeed in making fire. Fowler, season 3, could not get one going on his first day. If you ARE prepped properly, the ferrrorod is a wasted pick.

You are not going to homestead, so forget the axe, and the big saw. You dont want or need to cut big wood. A saw is needed, but you dont want one that requires both hands to use. This is especially true on Vancouver, cause you're forbidden to cut green trees. Fire doesnt feed you, and you should not need it for warmth. So it should not be a huge priority for you. Boiling water for drinking is a huge pita,  so instead, draw the water from a seep well (with a low wall and lid to keep out the crud). Then make a filter out of one leg of the rainsuit, Suspend the pants from your ridgepole, and  in one leg of the pants, have layers of moss, gravel, sand and charcoal, with a bit of T shirt to keep the crud from dripping into the container.

Edited by ratter

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A poncho is about as likely to keep you dry as the rainsuit,  (ie, not very)  but the poncho is a lot easier to make out of a tarp than to make a watertight container.  In an area as wet as Vancouver, water-tight containers are priceless.

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19 hours ago, dthomasdigital said:

Anyone watching this years season in Mongolia? Seems a tough place indeed. How come no one brings a box of matches?

 

I wish the show's producers would toss the Survivor show contestant format and actually choose people that have a chance of  actually winning >>>> seems like they have a selection process that they know will eliminate contestants down to a few rock solid types ....

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I agree, I mean folks taping out because they didn't bring a multi-tool to pull a fish hook out, I know I've had a push a fish hook or two out of my hand and just kept fishing.

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1 hour ago, dthomasdigital said:

I agree, I mean folks taping out because they didn't bring a multi-tool to pull a fish hook out, I know I've had a push a fish hook or two out of my hand and just kept fishing.

 

that's one of the more legit contestants that made the call - they are limited by what they can bring as tools - doubt that anyone wastes a tool choice on a small knife or multi-tool - even if she got the hook out the whole infection question comes into play - the health & welfare gurus have the final say about stuff like that ...

http://prepperhandbook.blogspot.com/2018/06/alone-season-5-pack-list.html

checked the list - 4 of the contestants choose a multi-tool ....

 

 

Edited by Illini Warrior
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I still watch it, but each season it gets more and more like "Survivor" or "Big Brother" to me with people playing to the cameras.  Mouse head on a stick? Give me a break.  But the lure of $500,000 is strong and you can't play if you don't get picked.  I blame the producers who (I think) coached them to be outrageous and then edit it those parts.

And they need to remove the disclaimer that these people are "trained survival experts" and replace it with one that says they are "survival hobbyists", in my opinion.  (for you kids, that means IMO! 🙂)

Edited by Brad

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How we check temperature in the wilds or build emergency temperature to check how many degre the temperature in the environment?

And there Nicole, sad Carlight must leave earlier.

Edited by Daimond25

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