Jump to content
Survival Threads
survivalbooty

How to Make a Debris Hut Shelter for Survival in the Wilderness

Recommended Posts

How to Make a Debris Hut Shelter for Survival in the Wilderness

It's the middle of winter and you are forced to bug out, you grab your bag and put yourself into survival mode. You need shelter, the best option to make it through the night alive is a Debris Hut.

It only takes an hour or two to setup. A debris hut is like a having sleeping bag, without the bag. If erected properly, this shelter can eliminate the need for a sleeping bag altogether! This will allow you to stay warm and dry in wintry rain or subfreezing conditions.

When you are facing a survivalist circumstance, shelter is exceptionally vital. Given that the body is not designed to endure these the kinds of extreme conditions, it is important that you look for ways to protect yourself from the snow, sun, and rain. Extreme temperatures are harsh on the body, so the skill of erecting a debris hut is important in any survival emergency situation.

To make a debris hut for shelter, begin with a fallen tree or pole that is about 1.5 to 2 times your height. Hold this main beam of the hut off the ground with a stump, forked tree, or rock.

Take note of wind direction, put the door of your debris hut facing away from the predominant wind. This will protect you from any objectionable elements blowing directly into the shelter.

Construct the framework (ribbing) for your debris hut by putting limbs; one inch to three inch in diameter against the main beam (ridge pole) of the shelter. This should be done at angles of about 45 degrees. Your debris hut should look similar to a low tent or triangle. It is helpful to lie under the main beam to make sure that there is a descent amount of clearance for your head and shoulders so you have the ability to move during the night.

Using smaller sticks, twigs, leaves, fern, and pine needles provides protection from the elements. Place the debris all around the framework of the hut, layering the debris about 3 feet thick. This will yield excellent insulation and protection for your shelter.

In winter climates, stacking snow on the outside debris can help too also add an extra layer of insulation to the shelter.

Body temperature can quickly dissipate by laying directly on bare ground. Place debris on the floor of the shelter. Select debris that would be comfy for you to sleep on such as leaves, ferns, or dead plants. When you’re ready to hit the sack, gather as many leaves as needed into the shelter, surrounding yourself with them and plugging the opening of the hut effectively creating a cocoon.

Be sure to adequately build your debris hut to grapple with the surrounding elements, it will insure adequate rest. Fatigue will lead to a bad attitude and outlook which directly affects your chances of survival.

Keep additional debris near the opening of the shelter. This will enable you to drag it over, if needed, to reinforce the entrance.

Tip: Use a t-shirt, fill with debris, then use it to close the opening.

A debris hut shelter is a simple, yet effective way, to utilize the harsh wilderness surroundings. Understanding how to correctly erect a debris hut shelter can help you to survive in any given situation or environment.

Arrgh,

Survival Booty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Canada this works really well with snow (as you mentioned), I think people with limited outdoor experience tend to misunderstand how important shelter is. I know I could technically survive with a tarp and a garbage bag but a proper structure (even if its just a lean to) is a huge boost in terms of both enhancing your odds of survival *and* moral.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thomas,


Unfortunately, there are limited ways to prepare edible plants in the wilderness. Raw is another option in lieu of pan fry or boiled. Many nuts or seeds are easy to forage, and taste great. Chestnuts are great roasted. Many plants are edible, they provide necessary nutrients, but they lack flavor. Leaching is also an alternative, this is accomplished by crushing the food, usually acorns, using a strainer, immersing it in running water or pouring boiling over the acorns to extract the tannins. Tannic acids are bitter to taste, leaching reduces the tannins, making them palatable. White oaks have the least amount of tannins, hence providing the best flavor.

Hope that helps...

Arrgh,
Survival Booty

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Point.....that's why i have 45 rounds of ammo and the obstinate misfortune of Deer camping on my front lawn in Saskatchewan..tannins are good for Hides...good post..

cheers

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was reading how to construct a shelter if I don't have any useful resource in my backpack like a blanket or a waterproof material. The most important thing is to keep warm at night. So, a natural poncho can be constructed. For this, you only need branches, large leaves, sand. Read more about different shelters and their characteristics here . Would you construct a natural shelter or you prefer to be always prepared to make a poncho shelter? I prefer to be prepared for both situations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/15/2016 at 6:38 PM, survivalbooty said:

How to Make a Debris Hut Shelter for Survival in the Wilderness

It's the middle of winter and you are forced to bug out, you grab your bag and put yourself into survival mode. You need shelter, the best option to make it through the night alive is a Debris Hut.

It only takes an hour or two to setup. A debris hut is like a having sleeping bag, without the bag. If erected properly, this shelter can eliminate the need for a sleeping bag altogether! This will allow you to stay warm and dry in wintry rain or subfreezing conditions.

When you are facing a survivalist circumstance, shelter is exceptionally vital. Given that the body is not designed to endure these the kinds of extreme conditions, it is important that you look for ways to protect yourself from the snow, sun, and rain. Extreme temperatures are harsh on the body, so the skill of erecting a debris hut is important in any survival emergency situation.

To make a debris hut for shelter, begin with a fallen tree or pole that is about 1.5 to 2 times your height. Hold this main beam of the hut off the ground with a stump, forked tree, or rock.

Take note of wind direction, put the door of your debris hut facing away from the predominant wind. This will protect you from any objectionable elements blowing directly into the shelter.

Construct the framework (ribbing) for your debris hut by putting limbs; one inch to three inch in diameter against the main beam (ridge pole) of the shelter. This should be done at angles of about 45 degrees. Your debris hut should look similar to a low tent or triangle. It is helpful to lie under the main beam to make sure that there is a descent amount of clearance for your head and shoulders so you have the ability to move during the night.

Using smaller sticks, twigs, leaves, fern, and pine needles provides protection from the elements. Place the debris all around the framework of the hut, layering the debris about 3 feet thick. This will yield excellent insulation and protection for your shelter.

In winter climates, stacking snow on the outside debris can help too also add an extra layer of insulation to the shelter.

Body temperature can quickly dissipate by laying directly on bare ground. Place debris on the floor of the shelter. Select debris that would be comfy for you to sleep on such as leaves, ferns, or dead plants. When you’re ready to hit the sack, gather as many leaves as needed into the shelter, surrounding yourself with them and plugging the opening of the hut effectively creating a cocoon.

Be sure to adequately build your debris hut to grapple with the surrounding elements, it will insure adequate rest. Fatigue will lead to a bad attitude and outlook which directly affects your chances of survival.

Keep additional debris near the opening of the shelter. This will enable you to drag it over, if needed, to reinforce the entrance.

Tip: Use a t-shirt, fill with debris, then use it to close the opening.

A debris hut shelter is a simple, yet effective way, to utilize the harsh wilderness surroundings. Understanding how to correctly erect a debris hut shelter can help you to survive in any given situation or environment.

Arrgh,

Survival Booty

you can do much better, if you take the right gear. I have 4 lbs of sleep shelter gear and 4 lbs of clothing (beyond what I'd wear to the office) and it suffices down to 10F, without a fire, and to near arctic conditions with the projected heat of a Siberian fire lay. All of my 2.5 lbs of  sleep/shelter stuff can be worn as a poncho, and the additional 1 lb of  monofilament gillnet hammock (without the lead weights) can feed me if need be. It's  6x100 ft of 2" mesh, with mule tape tree straps. Add another 1/4 lb for stakes and cordage.  You need shelter that can be put up or taken down in 5 minutes, that is not effected by its getting wet (stuffed sleeping bags suck) and it should include bug netting (for summer, but also as insulation in winter, between the  modified SOL escape bivvy and the PEVA  clear plastic bag,  A frost cloth bag should go between the bugnetting and the SOL. 

Edited by ratter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you not want to waste half a day, every day of travel, waste calories, have all that noise and movement to attract your killers, making a debris shelter. Getting one to be rainproof is a real pita, and it all requires the right resources, which often are not present.  Bad idea  for a bugout scenario, really bad, in fact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer the hammock, but I can set it up as a reclining slingchair, if there's just one decent sized tree. I can also cross the trekking poles, tie them at their tops, guy them out, and use them as a back rest, reclining, while sitting on my pack,  it's good down to 20F, without a fire, given my clothing choices. With the UCO candle lantern (beeswax ONLY) between my thighs. or with dry debris between the layers, I can go down to 10F.  With the projected heat of a Siberian fire lay (works to 2m) I can handle near-arctic temps. If this seated supershelter has the clear PEVA "door' facing the 9 am sun, the greenhouse effect will make it 40F warmer at noon than it was at dawn. So I can sleep from 11 am to 5 pm, given a 10 mg Ambien sleeping pill. Those things are a blessing, there's nothing comes close to them for utility in size, weight and likelihood of need in a crisis.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×