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Dan Seven

Safe Tick Removal

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Hey Gang:

It is heavy tick season here in Central Canada.

There is information floating around about drowning them with essential oils, burning them with a match and others, and these are not the way to do this as modern science has shown that they will regurgitate inside of you in their death throes.

 What may enter into you if this happens are things like Lyme's Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever if You are further West, or if in Europe, various tick borne forms of Encephalitis. Not good. Time to add one of these to your key chain to be safe, especially if You live in an area where disease carrying ticks are a concern.

For smaller ticks, where a tick key, or a tick spoon is too big to work properly, thus leaving the mouth parts remaining, or for fur areas in a pet, a fine pair of forceps- tweezers and a Q-tip with alcohol should do it. In fact, that is all i use..

https://www.amazon.ca/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=tick+keys&tag=googcana-20&index=aps&hvadid=174229435665&hvpos=1t1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16034205444962035867&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9001269&hvtargid=kwd-314638007738&ref=pd_sl_o0c8y0zzk_e

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tick-Forceps-Tweezers-Length-Stainless/dp/B004PGVPRC

What I have found works well is a fine pair of tweezers. Use gentle force with tweezers as close to the mouth parts as possible and pull the tick up and back till it 'pops out'.  Then i check the entry point for embedded mouth parts, (tiny brown specks) then use a cuticle cutter to clear anything like that out before swabbing with alcohol. A small loupe might be a good idea..

Sorry about the photo quality..

 

 

DSC05059.JPG

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Good timely post, the tics have arrived in New Mexico too. Of course the big worry for us this year is rattle snakes. We've had a wet spring (very odd for us as most springs we get zero rain), but the means more critters tics, spiders, snakes. 

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As shocking as it may sound, I have never gotten a tick in my life. :o 

Now, mosquito & spider bites? Those I get on a weekly basis. :( 

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2 hours ago, Thomas said:

As shocking as it may sound, I have never gotten a tick in my life. :o 

Now, mosquito & spider bites? Those I get on a weekly basis. :( 

You aren't missing anything Thomas. No idea how many I've picked off, pretty much all before they dug in though. ( they don't move fast which probably goes with being able to hang in a tree for 18 years. Hmmm maybe I can learn something from them. ) Slight aside. Ringing out the instruments on a power plant, the drawings looked like a flow sensor at the water inlet pumps was in a basement room that was solid spider web looking down through the ladder hatch. Used a broom stick to carve a tunnel through that and had a roll of spider web about 40 cm across when I was done. Was nicknamed "Spiderman" at that plant for awhile. Oddly, I don't think I've ever had a spider bite.

IMG_20170525_161503.thumb.jpg.0258aaea9e3a5b1db8852bff4c826830.jpg

Now there were a few mosquitoes out while I helped sink this 5 days ago. Proving the internet is right. There are local females desperate to meet me.  :D 

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13 minutes ago, Gary_Gough said:

Now there were a few mosquitoes out while I helped sink this 5 days ago. Proving the internet is right. There are local females desperate to meet me.  :D 

Maybe somewhat more vampiric in nature though, huh Gary ?

B|

 

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@Gary_Gough you're a power guy, how come I never put 2 and 2 together? Very cool I get to sit at my desk in the transmission control center. They never let me go to the field, well every now and then I get to go to a substation but they stare at me during the tailboard and say don't touch anything. 

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32 minutes ago, dthomasdigital said:

@Gary_Gough you're a power guy, how come I never put 2 and 2 together? Very cool I get to sit at my desk in the transmission control center. They never let me go to the field, well every now and then I get to go to a substation but they stare at me during the tailboard and say don't touch anything. 

Actually I was just helping the power guy. ( Got my Massey 1100 stuck pulling the truck a few times ) Parked the tractor under the power line break and he fixed the line from it with me being a gofer. I have done multiple shut downs at a 950 megawatt power plant, and rung out pretty well all the instruments when the control system got replaced if that counts :P

By the last time I was there it took 4 hours every day to run around, sign off on all the tailboards , put locks on boxes, work then run around taking locks off of boxes. Everyone else works in one area for a day ( turbine, air blower etc. ) but my area is the whole 16 story boiler, 4 story turbine hall and the transformers.

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I like the look of those tools but haven't seen them offered locally; looks fairly simple to replicate.  I must have pulled a thousand ticks off myself, and there will be more; it's the consequence of going out there.  Any bits of head/fang that became embedded generally caused a little infection, sometimes a sore, and came out in the course of healing.  The odd one made a lump under the skin and took longer (often those in poorly accessible places like the back of the head).  As well as the danger from tick-borne Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever there is a generic tick fever that you get from having too many ordinary tick bites.  The symptoms are common to those diseases (headache, fatigue, aching joints), but unlike them it won't cripple or kill you (it's still no fun).   

I've heard that taking a brewer's yeast supplement makes your blood unpalatable to ticks, but have yet to test it.

If you live or play in tick country you have to be a bit stoic about it, just take them off and kill them, carry a little pair of pliers if you have trouble crushing them between your fingernails. There will sometimes be hitch-hikers you don't notice for a couple of days until they un-hook and try to move.   I've seen people go mental when feeling a tick crawling around, and that (stress needle in the red) can't be good for you.

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Good points Rick:

Yes there is a a tick borne disease that is not caused by an infectious organism that they carry.

Tick paralysis is caused by an reaction to the neurotoxin that they carry in their salivary glands, and it appears to be the female tick of certain species responsible for these reactions both in pets as well as people.

Some folks react violently to it, mostly in young girls. Failure to remove the tick from these individuals may prove fatal within a day or 2. Dogs take 6-9 days for the symptoms to show up and i have read that it appears that cats are all but immune.

A video surfaced recently of an infected little girl in the UK whose parents(I suppose) are trying to figure out what is wrong with her.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/video/health/video-1467837/Girl-gets-tick-paralysis-tick-hair.html

cheers

 

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 Tick paralysis seems far more serious than tick fever, but luckily it isn't very common, at least not here in central Canada.  In the early 90's when Lyme Disease was almost unheard of in Saskatchewan there were a couple of positive tests done at a local lab, but they were from men who had been in the SE United States recently.  Eastern Canada got it first and then it moved in and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever moved in from the west.  Case studies and epidemiology from the UK can be key to solving our bug problems here; they had a West Nile epidemic there before it became an issue here, and it's a serious disease.

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Hi Rick..well are You in Sask?   I am out of Saskatoon. 

So far so good with Lyme's disease here in terms of numbers, and I hope that it stops at the borders because when i am taking care of my acreage this time of year i have to de-tick myself every couple of hours as a few always seem to get past no matter what i do. I have no pets at the moment, Lord knows what that would be like, and the only thing i can do is make sure the grass is cut down as much as possible in an effort to bake them out. Currently at 31C here so that will actually cut them down..

cheers

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On 2017-06-01 at 1:33 PM, Dan Seven said:

Hi Rick..well are You in Sask?

Yes, I'm in Regina.  There doesn't seem to be a real deterrent to ticks biting once you're in the  midst of them.  Folk remedies end up being unfounded, industrial poison doesn't discourage them, and they're tenacious little beggars.  When fishing along the riverbanks there are tons of them, and keeping pantlegs tucked into socks, wearing rubber boots, dark clothing, long sleeves and being vigilant is about all I can do.  They seem to like a light coloured unhooking mat I use, and sometimes there will be a bunch on that so interdiction has some limited success.  Mowing grass short around your buildings like you're doing is probably helping quite a bit. 

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 Good points Rick..

Chickens and Guinea Fowl are perfectly murder on ticks..We recently had a 'chickens as pets bylaw' in Saskatoon that was recently struck down. I am old enough to remember a time when the old Ukrainian lady down the alley kept chickens and a small plot of white poppies for her Christmas baking..They told her no more chickens in the mid 70's..and no more poppies a half a dozen years after.

Often enough 'senselessness' is when the 'sensible' is birthed from 'nonsense'..

This is why i have have a house out of town at the edge of a small Lake away from people sniffing out things that don't make sense to them. Being left the hell alone is underrated..

myhouse2.jpg

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On 6/6/2017 at 4:17 PM, Rick said:

Rick, we have been using these for many years on all our animals and they work well, cheap and efficient we always carry them on us and have them dotted all around the house, there are two sizes of them and yes they do work on humans!! The fun is in checking over your partner for ticks and other crawlies after every adventure/expedition! 

First post so hope I have done this right!

 

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Thanks for the review!, they should be coming in the mail soon.  I've got rid of a dozen or so hitch-hikers but only had a couple stuck on so far.

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Lars at Survival Russia put up a youtube video on basically prophylactic measures to avoid getting the ticks in the first place. Using the habits that ticks have developed to feed, against them.

 

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