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KCM

One Pistol for the Whole Family? Choose This One!

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CZ 75 P-01

Size:  Compact

Caliber:  9mm

Capacity:  14+1

Notable Features:  De-cocker, rubber grips, night-glow sights, magazine release

Closest Competitor:  Glock 19

Price: <$600

Pros: Light weight, low recoil, ease of use, small size, high capacity, concealability, reliability, outstanding grip for small hands, pointability, NATO approved, exceeded exhaustive durabilty/failure testing standards for Czech police issue

Cons:  Green dot sights are dimmer than white dot in daylight

I've owned lots of pistols and revolvers.  I'm a 1911 and revolver lover.  When it comes to a safe, affordable, quality, high-capacity pistol for concealed carry or all-around use, The CZ 75 P-01 cannot be bested.  BTW, 9mm is the most affordable and available pistol ammo on the planet.

 

IMG_0867.JPG

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I'm a Sig snob, but will give credit where credit is due.
The CZ 75 P-01 is a decent pistol. I know this because a friend of mine purchased one about 2 months ago and I had the pleasure of shooting it. I didn't care much for the trigger, longer pull than I like and the reset is a little long too. But if you train to the trigger there is no issue in that. The trigger is also allot more forward than I like to see. May be an issue for samaller hands.
It felt real good in my hand. Because of the aluminum frame she felt a little snappy while shooting, although totally controlable. A good shooter. Accuracy was good, I've seen allot better though.
I don't like the position of the decocker......... but I'm spoiled by my Sig decocker location.
Don't think I'd want to conceal it though. I consider it an OWB carry. 
Price.... well it's not bad. The same as another pistol I've been eyeing up..... The FNS-9 compact. The FN is a little less money as of today, as well as 5 ounces lighter. And the FN is double action only, not DA/SA as on the CZ. The trigger is much better than the CZ, less pull, shorter reset.
However, I'd never rule out this CZ. Nice pistol, good shooter.

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Good words, PappyHiker.  I'm 5'5" and 140 lbs.  I've been carrying compact 1911s IWB as well as compact revolvers.  This pistol is the same size and lighter weight with twice the capacity of a 1911. Hand fit is so important.  The rounded grip makes it very stable in the hand and not "edgy" to carry.  The trigger falls naturally on the first joint of my finger and I didn't notice anything unusual when shooting.  The magazine release clinched it for me, personally.  My wife prefers a compact Beretta for trigger pull length.

If you are small in stature, check many out for the best grip/trigger fit!  As for reliability an non-fussiness about ammo, the CZ is a "10."

Edited by KCM

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Metal frame handguns are easy to shoot, and soak up recoil very well.

 

DA/SA isn't all it's cracked up to be, imho. Different trigger pulls is never a good thing

 

CZ's love eating slide stops

 

Go look at cajun gun works if you want to have some work done to it. Its well worth it.

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Zackmars,

I'll let you borrow my Smiths, Colts or Ruger SP101 to gin up on DA/SA, LOL.  I don't even notice, anymore.  Double taps are a dream.  Like I said at the beginning, the CZ is a top contender if buying one pistol for a family.  I have a CZ 82 that will outshoot most anything I've ever tried.  The grueling Czeck Police test and NATO stock number printed on the slide sold me, personally.  But the grip feel tops all other "Pros."

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14 hours ago, KCM said:

Zackmars,

I'll let you borrow my Smiths, Colts or Ruger SP101 to gin up on DA/SA, LOL.  I don't even notice, anymore.  Double taps are a dream.  Like I said at the beginning, the CZ is a top contender if buying one pistol for a family.  I have a CZ 82 that will outshoot most anything I've ever tried.  The grueling Czeck Police test and NATO stock number printed on the slide sold me, personally.  But the grip feel tops all other "Pros."

Perfectly capable with DA/SA59384bdfa2d83_PointBlur_Jun072017_135338.thumb.jpg.f5b74d8a78e71deff437d737748dbf8e.jpg

20170607_135151.thumb.jpg.f8a4793c588a7256a77797a17c29e56a.jpg

 

It doesn't change the fact that DAO and SAO's are MUCH easier to shoot and master.

Of all the things I've seen trip up new shooters, DA/SA is #1

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Good info.  The most important thing is for folks to get good advice on what they should choose for their need/situation and then practice for muscle memory.  In most cases (for new shooters), I recommend a .38 revolver and/or a double barrel shotgun.  Why?  Simple, easy to operate under stress and not fussy.  Best?  Maybe not.  Sadly, most people don't practice.  Good or bad, concealed carry tests are using full sized targets at close ranges.  DA/SA shouldn't be an issue at those ranges for a home invasion if someone has practiced with their firearm.

PS Glocks are highly recommended.  I just don't care for them, personally.  But, I shoot them well.  🤓 

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@KCM   Good advice..a wheel gun and/or a dbbl barrel shotgun is a great way to start out for home defense.

95% of American Gun owners handle a firearm ONCE PER MONTH. 32% of US homes do not have a firearm.

Clearly for home defense it should be simple and uncomplicated mechanically. Totally agree with You there.

For me I have an old Enfield rifle and a .22 in the safe and that meets my needs. If i strike it rich i might consider some other options. Meanwhile I can shoot for cheap and have all the firepower i need.

The big danger where I live is isolation. I remember one Winter i was working from home, and I did not have a visitor for 3 months. If someone came to rob me, i was so starved for company.. i would have probably invited them in and made them hot chocolate and home made pizza..

cheers

 

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3 hours ago, KCM said:

Good info.  The most important thing is for folks to get good advice on what they should choose for their need/situation and then practice for muscle memory.  In most cases (for new shooters), I recommend a .38 revolver and/or a double barrel shotgun.  Why?  Simple, easy to operate under stress and not fussy.  Best?  Maybe not.  Sadly, most people don't practice.  Good or bad, concealed carry tests are using full sized targets at close ranges.  DA/SA shouldn't be an issue at those ranges for a home invasion if someone has practiced with their firearm.

PS Glocks are highly recommended.  I just don't care for them, personally.  But, I shoot them well.  🤓 

I've seen far more new shooters struggle with revolvers than autos. Reloads are a pain, and it takes work to learn how to use a speed loader.

 

Reloading an auto involves two buttons, the mag release, and the slide lock. A revolver, you need to release the cylinder, pop it out, insert 5/6/8 new rounds, and swing the cylinder back.

 

As far as double barrels go, again, outwards simplicity is not always a good thing, 2 rounds is not a lot of ammo, hopefully you aren't attacked by more than 2 guys, and hopefully you don't miss, or that the shot isn't effective.

 

If someone doesn't train, give them a weapon that requires the least amout of skill to manipulate effectively.

 

Can a revolver or double barrel be effective? Yeah, of course, people have effectively defended themselves with all sprts of things, but personal defense is not the kind of thing where you want to be "good enough". Not that I'm saying you need to run out and buy a 5k glock and a KAC SR15, but there is a happy medium.

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3 hours ago, Dan Seven said:

@KCM   Good advice..a wheel gun and/or a dbbl barrel shotgun is a great way to start out for home defense.

95% of American Gun owners handle a firearm ONCE PER MONTH. 32% of US homes do not have a firearm.

Clearly for home defense it should be simple and uncomplicated mechanically. Totally agree with You there.

For me I have an old Enfield rifle and a .22 in the safe and that meets my needs. If i strike it rich i might consider some other options. Meanwhile I can shoot for cheap and have all the firepower i need.

The big danger where I live is isolation. I remember one Winter i was working from home, and I did not have a visitor for 3 months. If someone came to rob me, i was so starved for company.. i would have probably invited them in and made them hot chocolate and home made pizza..

cheers

 

Revolvers are far more complicated than autos. Take a side plate off any DA/SA revolver and see.

 

We have a smith at our store, and we see TONS of revolvers locked up by simple things like dust. Or at worst, the owner watches too many movies, and spins the cylinder, and flicks it into place. Then they break the timing spring.

Our rental range has a variety of autos and revolvers, and the revolvers go down more often than the autos, from smith, ruger, and taurus/rossi

 

As far as the human element, the more of that you introduce, the higher the chance of an issue.

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3 hours ago, Dan Seven said:

The big danger where I live is isolation. I remember one Winter i was working from home, and I did not have a visitor for 3 months. If someone came to rob me, i was so starved for company.. i would have probably invited them in and made them hot chocolate and home made pizza.

Dan,

ROFL!

When it gets to 100F this summer, maybe I can come visit!

Kim

 

Edited by KCM

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Very good points Zackmars. The human element is indeed complicated..As for mechanically complicated..more moving parts, more to clean and maintain.  I agree that putting more rounds downrange affordable with the least hassle probably goes to a Glock. I have shot 2 dozen varieties of handguns at the range. All i know is what I like and shot best with is about all.

Revolvers probably have more sentimental value than anything else nowadays.. Picking up a cheap .38 is likely such an easy thing to do still. A collector friend of mine with a very large collection points to a 6" .357 Colt Python in Stainless as the one he would grab if he was headed out the door with no warning..It has a few thousand rounds through it as well.

 One day if i pick up a pistol it would likely be a Colt Combat Commander. It just fits me perfectly. Intuitive choice.

cheers 

 

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Zachmars,

I think we can both be right on this.  Or, take it to a gun board, LOL!  We are talking home defense here, not combat.  It sounds like you handle guns every day.  Few have that luxury.

This post was about selecting one "pistol" for the whole family for home defense.  It morphed from that.

All new shooters, fishermen or mechanics should be trained to practice and then clean, maintain and inspect their equipment as a matter of habit.  I've never had a revolver fail.  Our military Smith and Wesson .38s were "rung out" from qualifying airmen but cleaned and maintained.  Not one failure to fire.  Handed them a Beretta 92 and they looked bewildered.  Even after the manual and video time.

I have had bad or hard primers cause a failure to fire in pistols on numerous occasions.  This results in a "tap, rack, bang" drill that must be practiced.  I've also had stovepipe blockages with pistols.  You know how that goes.  Bad!  With revolvers you just keep pulling the trigger!

Take my 13 yr old daughter and daughter-in-law.  Not strong for racking heavy (for them) pump shotguns or semi-auto pistols.  Not practicing often.  Both learned to shoot revolvers and lighter and shorter double barreled shotguns (20 gauge).

Scenario:  11PM home invader.  Trained to go to safe room, grab the 26" long side-by-side shotgun with a simple, top tang safety, get behind the bed, aim it at the door and then call 911.   The revolver is on the nightstand.  All she has to know (when scared and the dog is barking) is to take off the safety or to pull the trigger on the revolver.  No safety.  This actually happened to my daughter in law.  They left the house without entering the bedroom.

You can argue that the newer semi-auto pistols don't all have manual safeties or a pump would be the same, but with more ammo to start with.  True.  If there were an opportunity (in the dark, scared, without much practice) to reload, a break-open shotgun is simple, easy and fast.  No turning the gun, no pressing a spring. No racking anything.  Our forefahers kept it simple because simple worked when things needed to be simple.  I don't want to stare down a double barrelled shotgun or a revolver.  In rare cases of home invasion or robbery are there more than two rounds fired, anyway.  The goal s to change behavior, fast.

Back to the post.  The CZ 75 P-01 is one of the great choices for a pistol that will serve he whole family well.  A revolver might be good to have, too!

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4 hours ago, KCM said:

Zachmars,

I think we can both be right on this.  Or, take it to a gun board, LOL!  We are talking home defense here, not combat.  It sounds like you handle guns every day.  Few have that luxury.

This post was about selecting one "pistol" for the whole family for home defense.  It morphed from that.

All new shooters, fishermen or mechanics should be trained to practice and then clean, maintain and inspect their equipment as a matter of habit.  I've never had a revolver fail.  Our military Smith and Wesson .38s were "rung out" from qualifying airmen but cleaned and maintained.  Not one failure to fire.  Handed them a Beretta 92 and they looked bewildered.  Even after the manual and video time.

I have had bad or hard primers cause a failure to fire in pistols on numerous occasions.  This results in a "tap, rack, bang" drill that must be practiced.  I've also had stovepipe blockages with pistols.  You know how that goes.  Bad!  With revolvers you just keep pulling the trigger!

Take my 13 yr old daughter and daughter-in-law.  Not strong for racking heavy (for them) pump shotguns or semi-auto pistols.  Not practicing often.  Both learned to shoot revolvers and lighter and shorter double barreled shotguns (20 gauge).

Scenario:  11PM home invader.  Trained to go to safe room, grab the 26" long side-by-side shotgun with a simple, top tang safety, get behind the bed, aim it at the door and then call 911.   The revolver is on the nightstand.  All she has to know (when scared and the dog is barking) is to take off the safety or to pull the trigger on the revolver.  No safety.  This actually happened to my daughter in law.  They left the house without entering the bedroom.

You can argue that the newer semi-auto pistols don't all have manual safeties or a pump would be the same, but with more ammo to start with.  True.  If there were an opportunity (in the dark, scared, without much practice) to reload, a break-open shotgun is simple, easy and fast.  No turning the gun, no pressing a spring. No racking anything.  Our forefahers kept it simple because simple worked when things needed to be simple.  I don't want to stare down a double barrelled shotgun or a revolver.  In rare cases of home invasion or robbery are there more than two rounds fired, anyway.  The goal s to change behavior, fast.

Back to the post.  The CZ 75 P-01 is one of the great choices for a pistol that will serve he whole family well.  A revolver might be good to have, too!

i never said self defense is the same thing as combat. not once.

 

i sell guns, and i watch people use them. i understand the various levels of skill people posses, and what is, and isn't a luxury.

 

people need to know how to do a lot of things, but they dont. if someone can't drive, the answer is not to give them a stick shift just because it is mechanically simple.

military pistols, like cop pistols, tend to be handled much, shot little. civilian guns get a much rougher ride. hell, we've had glocks that had been shot to the point where carbon completely covered the front sight, to the point carbon would almost weld the magazine in place.

 

if a round fails to fire, dont waste your time trying to double strike, what if your gun is empty? clear the malf, and observe the gun to see if it was a malfunction, or if the gun is empty. buy quality ammo, store it properly, and enjoy not having issues. dont end up like the idiot in the movies who pulls the trigger on an empty gun 50 billion times.

teach your DIL how to charge a pistol, i've seen quite a few peeps struggle with racking the slide, and this method hasn't failed (yet)

#1, grab pistol with strong hand, like you are shooting, point it at the ground

#2, drop magazine, grab the slide with support hand. you want as much of your hand to touch the slide as possible, fingers, palm, etc

#3, push downwards with your strong hand, keep your support hand still. once the slide is all the way back, use your strong hand to activate the slide lock

#4, slowly let the slide forward, and let it catch the lock

#5, insert loaded magazine, and using the thumb of your support hand, drop the slide lock

 

there is no reason why your scenario cant occur with a cheaper pistol caliber carbine and auto pistol.

 

"You can argue that the newer semi-auto pistols don't all have manual safeties or a pump would be the same, but with more ammo to start with.  True.  If there were an opportunity (in the dark, scared, without much practice) to reload, a break-open shotgun is simple, easy and fast."

 

i wouild argue that, and i will also argue that a break action shotgun is not fast, simple, or easy, since you get 2 rounds, to get 2 more, you need to push a tiny lever to the side, break the action, remove the 2 spent hulls, and put 2 more shells in, and close the action. add in stress, little training, and adrenalin, and id be amazed if you didnt have issues 

 

"Our forefahers kept it simple because simple worked when things needed to be simple.  I don't want to stare down a double barrelled shotgun or a revolver." 

 

they kept it simple because that's all they had, but they were also quite fond of crazy high tech (for the time) things like two shot rotating barrel rifles. America was a hotbed of firearms innovation, from lever action rifles, to machine guns. we are the reason why modern pistols look the way they do, so i dont see any reason to stick with older technology just because its American, when the newer ideas are just as American. I dont want to stare down a bb gun, that doesn't mean it won't work for home defense, nor does it mean there isn't better options.

 

"In rare cases of home invasion or robbery are there more than two rounds fired, anyway.  The goal s to change behavior, fast."

i dislike it when people say this. you cannot, and never will be able to guarantee this. what happens when you become the small percentage of people who needed more than 2 shots? home invasions are already extremely rare, and you think three people breaking in is some far off possibility, vs one or two?

 

your CZ is a fine gun, but to act as if a more complicated (to use) firearm is better for the inexperienced  just because its outwardly simpler is ridiculous, and just doesn't stand up well under scrutiny.

 

let me condense this; a firearm without training is like a car without tires. and like guns, there are cars that are easy to drive, and cars that are hard to drive, and on the cars that are easy to drive, it is easier to become proficient with less training. while a stick shift/revolver/break action might be "simpler" it achieves this simplicity by passing a large amount of work onto the shooter/driver. a new shooter/driver can easier focus on other matters, like the target or environment, when they no longer have to worry about manually operating their car or gun. This doesn't mean everyone should be forced to use an automatic firearm or car, however

Edited by zackmars
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Zackmars,

We can agree to disagree on this one.  I've had a loaded gun pointed at me in anger before.  When about to pee one's pants, simpler is better!  I carry semi-autos daily, but I practice often.  I can eject and reload two rounds in my coach gun faster than you can say "I wonder how fast he can load that thing?"

One thing we agree on:  Practice.

I've personnally switched from revolvers and compact 1911s to the higher capacity CZ.  The wife prefers a Beretta.  For me, the choice was between a Glock or the CZ.  The grip and mag release sold the CZ.  No gun is one size fits all.  Or, we'd all still be using "Peacemakers."  Wait!  That would be a great home defense gun!

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1 minute ago, KCM said:

Zackmars,

We can agree to disagree on this one.  I've had a loaded gun pointed at me in anger before.  When about to pee one's pants, simpler is better!  I carry semi-autos daily, but I practice often.  I can eject and reload two rounds in my coach gun faster than you can say "I wonder how fast he can load that thing?"

One thing we agree on:  Practice.

I've personnally switched from revolvers and compact 1911s to the higher capacity CZ.  The wife prefers a Beretta.  For me, the choice was between a Glock or the CZ.  The grip and mag release sold the CZ.  No gun is one size fits all.  Or, we'd all still be using "Peacemakers."  Wait!  That would be a great home defense gun!

Aww, c'mon, discussion is good!

 

People who dont train, are unfortunately, the vast majority, people struggle with even the simplest of tasks (oh the stories i could tell)

 

The point I'm trying to make is that certain guns will go farther with certian skill levels, and that in my experience, someone who hardly ever shoots their gun might be better served with a gun that requires less user input.

 

As you said, no gun is one size fits all, and we have a market that is large and varied enough that pretty much everyone can get a gun that fits them to a t.

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"The point I'm trying to make is that certain guns will go farther with certian skill levels, and that in my experience, someone who hardly ever shoots their gun might be better served with a gun that requires less user input."

I am blue in the face!  LOL!  A quality revolver requies less user input for a lower level of practice/proficiency.  Grab, point, pull the trigger!  Pull again!  Can be kept loaded and relatively safe if users with access know the cardinal rules of gun safety!  Same with a double bsrrel shotgun.  Dude!  😆

The CZ or Glock semi-autos are better for capacity and faster reloading, but require more training to clear low probability of jams/misfire/failure to load, etc..

Wait!  We forgot lever actions!

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2 hours ago, KCM said:

"The point I'm trying to make is that certain guns will go farther with certian skill levels, and that in my experience, someone who hardly ever shoots their gun might be better served with a gun that requires less user input."

I am blue in the face!  LOL!  A quality revolver requies less user input for a lower level of practice/proficiency.  Grab, point, pull the trigger!  Pull again!  Can be kept loaded and relatively safe if users with access know the cardinal rules of gun safety!  Same with a double bsrrel shotgun.  Dude!  😆

The CZ or Glock semi-autos are better for capacity and faster reloading, but require more training to clear low probability of jams/misfire/failure to load, etc..

Wait!  We forgot lever actions!

No, again, it does not require less input.

 

Loading/reloading is far more complex.

 

Semi's can be had without manual safeties

What on earth is causing you to think that semis are so complicated?

 

Can you not just grab a semi and keep pulling the trigger? (Trick question, you can)

 

A DA/SA revolver, fully loaded, is no more or less safe than any other handgun without a manual saftey. Nothing blocks the trigger.

 

Jams are extremely infrequent with moder semis and ammo, and being user clearable is a huge plus. God forbid someone sells you a revolver that looses it's timing after 2 rounds.

 

Please stop, your revolver is in no way shape or form, simpler than an auto. Be it what it requires of the shooter, or how many parts are in the gun.

 

I've seen far more people struggle with manually operated firearms than with auto loaders. And add in the fact that every point you've brought up to support revolvers can just as easily be had in an auto loader...

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I'm no expert at all, but there is a lot of cop-based info still around from the last century about "cops use revolvers because they are simple and don't break, look at Dirty Harry"

Technology has improved since John Moses Browning's day, and few cops still use revolvers as primary carry.  There's a reason for that....

Now, I still like my Judge loaded with .410 field load in copperhead country, or next to the bed, loaded with rubber buckshot, but maybe that's just me. . )

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ROFL!  The discussion guy says, "Stop!"

Ya'll just ignore Zach and I.  We're both stubborn.  But, I want him on my team if we are choosing sides for SHTF!

OK, for fun, let's take grandma, with a touch of arthritis and weaker hands, and her 5th grade grand-daughter, to the range and see how long it takes them to load a 5 or six shot revolver and hit a full sized target at 10 to 15 feet.  Granted, some dbl action trigger spings are stiff (for lawyers), so we won't select the .44 magnum.  Maybe a .22 with 9 shots or a .38 Special +P.  There's always the option to teach them to cock the thing with the intuitively obvious hammer as a last resort.  Then, we'll repeat with a semi-auto.

Revolver:  Here we go! Open the cylinder, drop cartriges in there until all the holes are full, close the cylinder, aim, pull!  Pull again!  5 minutes on the range with no class time and we are hitting the target.  Clear it by opening the cylinder and tapping the cylinder rod.  Lay it down.  Whew!

Then, let's repeat the process with any semi-auto.  Never mind that!  To make it fair, we'll limit ourselves (from the miriad of choices) to a striker fired pistol, so no manual safety (optional) or exposed hammer.  Forget a beloved 1911 or clones.  

Pistol:  Here we go!  Load the magazine, rack the slide (can't manage that, grandma? Let me do that for you)), insert the magazine, make sure it "clicked" No "click?"  "Whack it with the palm of your hand, grandma!" Release the slide (remind them about the slide release button) aim, pull!  Pull again!  Keep teaching safety for the rest of the semi-autos out there.  But, we used a Glock.  Just lay it down.  Whew!  Wait!  Clear that thing, first!  Drop the magazine (this button, grandma), rack the slide 3 times.  Well, at least until it locks open.  Whew!  Wait!  What if it didn't lock open?

Can the 5th grader or grandma even succesfully load the magazine to capacity to start with?  They don't have a Maglula or know what it is!

To make it interesting, lets load the guns for them for the second round.  But, put a round in there at random with no primer to simulate a bad primer.  The test is on!  Which will be easier for the student?  Just keep pulling the trigger because you can't remember the tap and rack drill and the wild hog is getting closer, Man!

Now, since grandma is on a strict budget, we'll ask her to cash in her change jar and go shopping for a new revolver.  $356.57 enough?  No problem at Academy!  Maybe, I'll take her to the local gun shop and find a "like new" deal on a Smith and Wesson!  Find a striker fired pistol for $356.57!

Grandma is happy.  She feels safer.  She can remember how to operate the revolver after one training session.  She just needs to practice.  She knows I'll clean it for her with s smile on my face!

Edited by KCM

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if i was retarded..or suffering from a blow to the head i would pick a wheel gun.

For Grandma, a hand grenade in her knitting, just pull the pin and throw the basket.

For Grandma's Grade 5 Grand-daughter i would buy her this t-shirt.

boysarestupid.jpg

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Yes!  Did i tell you i suffered a blow to head?  I forget....😎

Edited by KCM

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